Spacious home in Goatstown for €695,000

Three-storey Dublin 14 property with four-bedrooms and large rear garden

 

Built in 1960, number 220 Lower Kilmacud Road has matured nicely in the years since then. It has served the McNestry family well as a family home for 20 of those years.

An extension, added in 1998 and designed by architect David Clarke, added living space across the rear, a porch to the front and turned the garage into a utility room. A fifth bedroom became a family bathroom and the existing bathroom became an en suite for the main bedroom.

With gardens back and front and 164sq m (1,765sq ft) of living space, number 220 has plenty to offer as a family home. Agent Haines Home Managers is asking €695,000 for what is a four-bedroom house with a reception room and kitchen/breakfast/living area over three levels.

The entrance porch stretches across the front of the house and is lit by a pleasant, pitched window. From here a door leads directly to a large utility room, which in turn leads to the kitchen/living/ breakfastroom with, over the breakfast room, another pitched glass, timber-beamed window. The living area has a stove and the kitchen is fully fitted.

A sittingroom to the front on this level has a wood-framed Rationel window and gas-fired fireplace with charcoal slate surround. A space under the stairs has been put to good use as a secluded reading nook.

There are two bedrooms and a family bathroom with a timber floor on the first floor. A smaller, blue-painted bedroom, is to the rear while the main, en suite bedroom, which has a wall of built-in wardrobes and large window, is to the front. The bedrooms on the third floor have notably high ceilings and the landing on this level has a reading space with shelves and seating. There is access to an attic and good eaves storage.

A 66ft long rear garden is mostly lawn with planting to the sides and high wooden fences. There is parking for a couple of cars to the front.

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