Six of the best films to see at the cinema this weekend

Take your pick between friendship and sexual intrigue, home-front pluck and scary white privilege, cannibals and vampires

Reeling comedy: Gemma Arterton in Their Finest

Reeling comedy: Gemma Arterton in Their Finest

 

HANDSOME DEVIL  ★★★★
Directed by John Butler. Starring Fionn O’Shea, Nicholas Galitzine, Moe Dunford, Andrew Scott, Michael McElhatton, Ruairi O’Connor, Amy Huberman. 15A cert, gen release, 94 min
Fionn O’Shea is terrific as Ned, a sensitive music fan who feels ostracised at a school where rugger is the authorised religion.  He has a friend in Dan (Andrew Scott), the cultured English teacher, and an enemy in the boorish games master Pascal (Moe Dunford).  The conflict between tribes is exemplified – and complicated – when Fionn gets a new roommate in the form of handsome, charismatic Conor (Nicholas Galitzine). DC Review/Trailer

THEIR FINEST  ★★★★
Directed by Lone Scherfig. Starring Gemma Arterton, Sam Claflin, Bill Nighy, Helen McCrory, Jack Huston, Richard E. Grant, Rachael Stirling, Henry Goodman, Jeremy Irons. Cert 12A, gen release, 117mins
This adaptation of Lissa Evans’ novel Their Finest Hour and a Half examines the role of women on the home front. During the 1940 bombing of London, talented copywriter Catrin Cole (Arterton) is drafted in by the Ministry of Information’s Film Division to bring a female perspective to their propaganda reels. The best Lone Scherfig film since 2009’s An EducationTB  Review/Trailer

THE TRANSFIGURATION ★★★★
Directed by Michael O’Shea. Starring Eric Ruffin, Chloe Levine, Aaron Clifton Moten. Club, IFI members, 97mins
In Michael O’Shea’s fiendish subversion of the genre, a vampire-obsessed outsider teen named Milo keeps a killing diary and watches YouTube videos of slaughterhouses. He lives at home with his older brother in a primarily black New York neighbourhood overrun by gangs and guns. Against this, Milo seems like a decent, if confused fellow who goes to school and who befriends another outcast, Sophie (Chloe Levine), a self-harming girl with a troubled home life. TB  Review/Trailer

THE HANDMAIDEN  ★★★★ 
Directed by Chan-wook. Starring Kim Min-hee, Kim Tae-ri, Ha Jung-woo and Cho Jin-woong . Cert 18, limited release, 145 mins
Lovely, sexually explicit Korean adaptation of Sarah Walters’s Fingersmith. This is easily the most lavish period piece of the past year, composed of striking, bewitching tableaux that could often pass for ancient scrolls or woodcuttings. The tricksy plot streamlines and improves the final, messy section of the source novel to mislead even the most astute viewer. Not the grand, bloody spectacle we were expected from the Stoker director, but a grand, bloody spectacle, nonetheless. TB  Review/Trailer

RAW  ★★
Directed by Julia Ducournau. Starring Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf, Rabah Naït Oufella, Laurent Lucas, Joana Preiss. 18 cert, limited release, 98 min
A veterinary student, originally a vegetarian, turns to cannibalism after tasting flesh. The Franco-Belgian horror does a great job of representing the carnivorous urge as a Cronenbergian disease. What really sets Raw apart, however, is the appalling power of its disgusting images. Francis Bacon would have got on all right with the dripping flesh. Hannibal Lecter would, however, have been disgusted at the inelegant preparation of the comestibles. DC Review/Trailer

GET OUT ★★★★★
Directed by Jordan Peele. Starring Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Catherine Keener, Bradley Whitford, Caleb Landry Jones, Stephen Root, Milton “Lil Rel” Howery, Betty Gabriel. 15A cert, gen release, 104 min
Magnificent social horror that – in imitation of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner – sends a white girl and her black boyfriend to her parents in liberal suburbia. Here is a film about racism in a supposedly post-racial society that features few acts of explicit prejudice. The film builds elegantly from sinister omens to full-on viscera-gurgling mayhem. But Get Out has more to do with discomfort and envy than blind hatred. What a strange marvel it is.  DC Review/Trailer

  • For reviews of all films currently on release, 
    see our Film Reviews page
The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.