Germany’s Reus likely to miss Ireland qualifier

Dortmund star suffered another ankle ligament injury at the end of 2-1 win over Scotland last night

Germany’s Marco Reus receives medical treatment towards the end of Germany’s win over Scotland. Photograph: Ina Fassbender/Reuters

Germany’s Marco Reus receives medical treatment towards the end of Germany’s win over Scotland. Photograph: Ina Fassbender/Reuters

 

Germany’s Marco Reus has been ruled out for a month with the ankle ligament injury he suffered during Germany’s 2-1 win over Scotland on Sunday.

The 25-year-old is likely to miss Germany’s next two Euro 2016 qualifiers against Poland (October 11th) and the Republic of Ireland (October 14th) next month.

He will definitely miss Dortmund’s Champions League ties with Arsenal and Anderlecht as well as up to five Bundesliga encounters due to the injury.

The Germany international was ruled out of this summer’s World Cup after he damaged ankle ligaments immediately prior to the national team’s departure for Brazil in June.

His latest injury affects the same ankle.

A statement on the Bundesliga club’s website on Monday confirmed: “A scan carried out by BVB’s club doctor Markus Braun at Dortmund’s Knappschaft Hospital on Monday revealed that Reus suffered a sprained ankle as well as a partially torn ankle ligament and is expected to be sidelined for four weeks.”

Reus made a surprisingly quick return to action following his injury in June, featuring as captain in a match against Stuttgarter Kickers only two months into what was expected to be a three-month recovery.

He also played in Dortmund’s first two Bundesliga matches and appeared to have made a full recovery, only to suffer another injury following a challenge by Scotland’s Charlie Mulgrew moments from the end of Sunday’s European Championship qualifier in his home Dortmund stadium.

“It’s incredible the bad luck he has had in a Germany shirt,” said Bayern Munich midfielder and Germany team-mate Thomas Muller on Sunday night.

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