Anthony Foley died of acute pulmonary oedema caused by heart disease

Munster head coach’s remains will be flown home to Shannon Airport on Wednesday

Munster and Ireland international Anthony Foley died suddenly in Paris at the age of 42. Images: The Irish Times/ Inpho

 

Anthony Foley, the late Munster rugby head coach, died of acute pulmonary oedema caused by heart disease, the French coroner’s report issued on Tuesday concluded.

“Cardiac arrhythmia caused an acute oedema of the lungs,” said Emmanuelle Lepissier, spokeswoman for the prosecutor of Nanterre, who is responsible for the investigation into Mr Foley’s death.

Pulmonary oedema means that excess fluid collects in numerous air sacks in the lungs, making it difficult to breathe.

Prosecutor Catherine Denis issued a burial permit upon receiving the conclusion of the autopsy. The permit was to be delivered to the Irish Embassy in Paris on Tuesday night. “I expect the remains will be repatriated quickly,” Ms Lepissier said.

Second Captains

She confirmed that Mr Foley’s body was found in his room at the Novotel in Suresnes, a suburb west of Paris, at 12.40 on Sunday, by a member of hotel staff and a player from the Munster team. The squad assumed Mr Foley was having a lie-in when he did not come downstairs for breakfast, but grew alarmed when they did not see him by late morning.

Meanwhile, the funeral arrangements for Mr Foley have been confirmed.

His remains will be flown home to Shannon Airport on Wednesday, from where they will be brought to his family home (private) in Killaloe, Co Clare.

They will lie in repose at St Flannan’s Church, Killaloe from 1pm to 8.30pm sharp on Thursday evening. People intending on paying their respects to Anthony are asked to attend early. House afterwards is private.

Funeral Mass will take place at noon on Friday at St Flannan’s Church, with Church reserved for family and friends only. Burial afterwards will be at Relig Núa Cemetery, Killaloe. Family flowers only.

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