Landlords offer over 150 Dublin properties for social housing

72 landlords willing to rent through Dublin council scheme started one month ago

The number of landlords willing to rent to social housing tenants plummeted in recent years with the rise in Dublin rents making higher-income tenants more attractive. File photograph: Chris Ison/PA Wire

The number of landlords willing to rent to social housing tenants plummeted in recent years with the rise in Dublin rents making higher-income tenants more attractive. File photograph: Chris Ison/PA Wire

 

More than 150 Dublin houses and flats have been offered by private landlords for social housing since local authorities began a rental recruitment drive just over a month ago.

The number of landlords willing to rent to social housing tenants plummeted in recent years with the rise in Dublin rents making higher-income tenants more attractive.

In Dublin city alone, 381 landlords have pulled out of long-term arrangements with the council in the past five years.

At the end of May, Dublin’s four local authorities began a campaign offering guaranteed rents of up to 92 per cent of market value, to encourage landlords to rent to low-income households.

Dublin City Council is now assessing 152 properties owned by 72 landlords, most of whom are interested in long-term rental agreements with the council.

Schemes

Three schemes are being offered. The rental accommodation scheme (RAS) requires landlords to sign up for a minimum of four years. The council allocates tenants, collects rent and guarantees no arrears or loss of income if the property is vacant for a period.

The council will pay up to 92 per cent of market value and agrees to a rent review every two years.

The landlord remains responsible for maintenance and must sign up with the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).

Longer-term

For landlords interested in a longer-term commitment, the councils are offering a leasing arrangement. The landlord’s relationship is exclusively with the council, he or she is under no maintenance obligation and does not have to sign up to the PRTB.

The rental period is 10-20 years, and the rent is typically 80-85 per cent of market rents. Rent is guaranteed for the period, and can be reviewed every five years.

Under the third scheme, the housing assistance payment (HAP), the landlord is still paid by the council but can select tenants and agree rent. The contract is between landlord and tenant, and the landlord is responsible for maintenance.

A study by the Simon Communities last week found fewer than 8 per cent of properties to rent in Dublin were affordable within State rent payment caps.