Beltany Property Finance an affiliate of Goldman Sachs

Accounts reveal firm paid Irish banks over €700m for loans since the middle of 2014

Martin Maloinowsk is among the familes facing notice to quit their homes in Tyrrelstown. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw/PA

Martin Maloinowsk is among the familes facing notice to quit their homes in Tyrrelstown. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw/PA

 

The Tyrrelstown residents appear to be facing eviction from their homes as a result of an agreement to sell them reached by the developers and landlord on one side, and on the other by Beltany Property Finance, which bought the loans on the properties from Ulster Bank.

While Beltany is virtually unknown to the public, it is an affiliate of an altogether more ubiquitous beast: Goldman Sachs, infamously known as the “vampire squid” of international finance.

Goldman earned this derogatory title from Rolling Stone magazine for its extraordinary ability to suck value for itself out of deals. The firm has bought several large portfolios of Irish property loans from banks in recent years. Most of the deals were consummated using Beltany.

Assets

Its accounts show it has paid Irish banks more than €700 million for loans since the middle of 2014. Beltany has filed accounts only for the last eight months of 2014 during which it was incorporated, but they clearly demonstrate the tax-efficiency of its design.

It generated income in those eight months of €44 million. Beltany is financed, however, by complicated loan notes issued by another tentacle of the Goldman empire, the costs of which ensure its taxable profits are minimised.

Paid €250 in tax

Central Bank

Beltany has bought €313 million of mainly commercial property loans from IBRC, its accounts show, €232 million from Ulster Bank and €171 million from Danske Bank. Some high-profile borrowers, such as Galway builder Padraic Rhatigan, escaped its clutches through refinancing deals.

The Tyrellstown residents, however, are unlikely to have such a happy ending.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.