Troika mission focuses on health

 

European Commission sources have said the EU-IMF-ECB troika mission in Dublin this week will focus on strengthening budgetary management in the health sector.

Minister for Health James Reilly’s department will be under scrutiny after it emerged that experts from the European Union, International Monetary Fund and European Central Bank had particular concerns about budget overruns in the health sector.

The eighth review of Ireland’s bailout programme will examine the possibility of strengthening budgetary management in the sector to ensure agreed objectives can be delivered within budget, commission sources said.

Dr Reilly’s spokesman said measures to improve and enhance financial controls were already being implemented. “One of the chief concentrations at this time is the putting in place of medium and long term solutions to enhance the capacity of the HSE to enforce financial control,” the spokesman said.

“In recent times international financial expert Mark Ogden carried out an examination in the HSE and produced a report highlighting the improvements to be made in financial controls.

“The recommendations included the putting in place of key figures at national and local level both in the HSE and in the Department of Health. Further interventions involving other financial consultants underscored these points. These improvements and enhancements are currently being implemented.”

The mission that got under way yesterday will also consider potential measures to kick-start lending to small and medium-sized enterprises.

Commission sources said the mission would focus on ensuring Ireland’s remaining fiscal adjustment was durable, growth-friendly and in line with programme targets. There would also be an emphasis on ensuring burden-sharing was fair and that the most vulnerable members of society were protected.

The review will also focus on the further development of ongoing technical work which sources said would enhance the sustainability of the bailout programme.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.