What to watch on TV this week

OJ: Made in America, Fake News, Three Girls, Conor Pope, Luisa Omielan and The Keepers

OJ Simpson during his murder trial. Photograph: ESPN Films

OJ Simpson during his murder trial. Photograph: ESPN Films

 

OJ: Made in America – Storyville
Monday-Thursday, BBC4, 10pm

Ezra Edelman’s mammoth Oscar-winning documentary telling the story of the rise and fall of OJ Simpson spanning three decades. Split into five parts by BBC, the story began last night with the tale of OJ’s rise to fame through college football, his NFL career, his move to Hollywood and his meeting of Nicole Brown. The drama continues tonight with a further exploration of America’s two greatest fixations – race and celebrity.

The Fake News Show
Monday, Channel 4, 8.30pm

Having first aired as a one-off episode during Channel 4’s Fake News Week earlier this year, Stephen Mangan returns for a new series proper of the panel show. Along with team captains Katherine Ryan and Richard Osman, Mangan aims to “the wobbly façade of fake news, disect the outlandish headlines, wild lies, dodgy Photoshops and all-too-believable viral clips that have pushed post-truth to the front pages.” Good luck with that.

Three Girls
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, BBC One, 9pm

In May 2012, 12 men were charged with sex-trafficking and rape of underage girls in the Rochdale area of Manchester. The gang groomed up to 47 vulnerable young teenagers, plying them with drink and drugs, and passing them round to friends and even family for sex. The perpetrators were mostly British Pakistanis, many of them respected family men, and police were accused of being slow to investigate for fear of being seen as racist.

Liv Hill, Molly Windsor and Ria Zmitrowicz in Three Girls. Photograph: BBC
Liv Hill, Molly Windsor and Ria Zmitrowicz in Three Girls. Photograph: BBC

When some of the victims tried to tell their story, they were ignored by the authorities. This three-part dramatisation tells the story of the Rochdale sex abuse ring from the perspective of three of the victims, Holly, Ruby and Amber, who are drawn into a frightening world of abuse, exploitation and betrayal. Maxine Peake plays sexual health worker Sara, who is determined to help the girls get their voices heard.

Conor Pope’s Consumer 999
Thursday, TV3, 8.30

Conor Pope. Photograph: Matt Kavanagh
Conor Pope. Photograph: Matt Kavanagh

He’s the bane of dodgy dealers, cowboy builders and rogue traders, and now Conor Pope is back to help us avoid scams and sharp practice. As anyone who watched his first series knows, Pope’s not afraid to confront the conmen and demand that they mend their fraudulent ways, and in this new series, promises to expose more companies who are misleading their customers, along with providing valuable consumer tips, advice and insights.

Luisa Omielan’s What Would Beyonce Do?!
BBC One, Friday, 11.55pm

Born in Birmingham to parents of Polish descent, Luisa Omielan’s has been a rising star of the stand-up circuit for a few years now, and has her efforts rewarded with this one-off comedy special for the BBC. “What Would Beyoncé Do?” is Omielan’s hit show from the Edinburgh Fringe, and sees the comedian attempting to solve a number of issues by imagining how the singer would tackle them.

The Keepers
Netflix, from Friday

Who killed Sister Cathy? Following the huge success of Making A Murderer, Netflix is premiering its latest true crime series. Director Ryan White travels to Baltimore to try to uncover a long-buried murder mystery, the death of local nun and high-school teacher Sister Cathy Cesnik. The nun, well-loved in her community, went missing in November 1969, and her body was found two months later.

The murder was never solved, but in the 1990s, a former student of Sister Cathy – “Jane Doe” – came forward with a horrific story of sexual abuse by the school’s chaplain. She claimed the chaplain showed her Sister Cathy’s body. White, whose aunt was one of Sister Cathy’s students in Baltimore, became fascinated by the story, and tracked down “Jane Doe” to interview her. He also had conversations with friends, relatives, officials and others in Baltimore, including two of Sister Cathy’s former students who have been conducting their own investigation over the years. White began his quest long before Making a Murderer came out, and he’s managed to delve deep into a community that’s still coming to terms with the dark secrets that lie buried in its local history.

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