UK floods: Cumbria prepares for weekend of heavy rain

Rainfall expected to be less Storm Desmond levels but rivers still at risk of overflow

Furniture and fittings piled up outside a house as the clean-up continues following flooding in Carlisle, Cumbria. Photograph: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

Furniture and fittings piled up outside a house as the clean-up continues following flooding in Carlisle, Cumbria. Photograph: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

 

Flood-hit Cumbria in the UK is preparing for a second weekend of potential flooding as more rain is expected to hit the north of England.

Although only 3.8cm of rain is forecast for the affected areas in Cumbria today, there is still a risk of localised flooding because of raised water levels, the Met Office has said.

River levels in the county remain high, with floods having deluged homes and businesses for five days after Storm Desmond.

The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning, and a spokesman said that although the forecaster is not expecting floods as severe as those seen last weekend, it would not take “an awful lot of rain” for there to be a risk of rivers overflowing.

The spokesman said the rain is expected to fall from around 7am this morning to mid-afternoon, and added that there would be patchy rain later tomorrow of about 3-5mm.

Chris Wilding, the UK environment agency’s flood duty manager, said: “River levels are high and the ground is saturated after the exceptional rainfall from Storm Desmond and rain this week, so we continue to ask people to remain vigilant with further rainfall expected this weekend.”

The affected areas include Carlisle, Keswick, Kendal, Cockermouth, Appleby and Glenridding, along with St Michael’s in Lancashire.

The latest threat to beleaguered residents comes as Amir Khan, the two-time world champion boxer, said he will provide moral and practical support to those affected by the flooding.

Mr Khan is leading a joint operation with his Amir Khan Foundation and humanitarian charity Penny Appeal, and plans to visit Carlisle today.

He said: “The UK community has been so supportive of me and this is just a small way I can give back. Once the flood water disappears, the hard work really starts, as families, most with children, return to severely damaged homes and destroyed possessions.

“It’s important that we come together, as British people do at times like this, and remind those affected that they’re not alone in dealing with this crisis.”

PA