State a ‘third world country’ when it comes to water

Water cut-offs coming with disappointing regularity , says restaurant body

Adrian Cummins chief executive of the Restaurants Association of Ireland said more than 9,000 delegates were in the city centre tonight for the technology web summit and water in restaurants would be turned off at 8pm. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons / The Irish Times

Adrian Cummins chief executive of the Restaurants Association of Ireland said more than 9,000 delegates were in the city centre tonight for the technology web summit and water in restaurants would be turned off at 8pm. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons / The Irish Times

 

There is “real anger” in the business community about the latest water restrictions in Dublin, according to the Restaurants Association of Ireland.

Chief executive of the association, Adrian Cummins, said the situation was comparable to “ a third world country”.

With more than 9,000 delegates in the city centre today for the technology web summit, he said water in restaurants would be turned off at 8pm. “It is an embarrassment,” he said.

Remarking that water restrictions now seemed to be coming “every few months” Mr Cummins told the Irish Times that businesses in Dublin paid the highest water charges in Europe and the highest commercial rates in Europe.

He called for “someone to be made accountable” remarking that “ if a chef was to consistently be unable to deliver the food you know what would happen to them”.

Mr Cummins added that if water could remain on until 9.30pm or 10pm the restriction might not be as severe “ and the people who pay the city council’s rates would be able to earn the money to do so”.

Water restrictions are due to begin nightly from tonight at 8pm until 7am and last at least five days across all Dublin local authorities due to problems at a treatment plant.

Dublin City Council press office this morning said it was checking to see if any special arrangements were being put in place for the restauranteurs . A spokesman said householders would not be expected to run out of water, but he acknowledged attic water tanks would not be enough to maintain supply for the hospitality industry.

A spokesman for Minister for the Environment Phil Hogan said the issue was a matter for Dublin City Council.

“We would like to see them doing everything in their power to resolve the problem and we imagine they are doing so,” he said.

Irish Water said it would not assume responsibility for the provision of water supplies until next year. The target date is January 1st.