Scorchio! Temperatures set to hit 25 degrees this week

Met Éireann says five consecutive days of 25 degrees needed for ‘heat wave’

 Families enjoy the long evening light at dusk as they watch people jump from Creevy Pier, kayak and paddle board in Donegal Bay last week.  Photograph: Bryan O’Brien/The Irish Times

Families enjoy the long evening light at dusk as they watch people jump from Creevy Pier, kayak and paddle board in Donegal Bay last week. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien/The Irish Times

Mon, Jul 21, 2014, 11:48

Stock up on sunscreen because temperatures could reach 25 degrees across the country this week.

It will be warm, humid and partly cloudy today and for the rest of the week with temperatures averaging in the mid-20s.

However, from tomorrow temperatures in much of the country should hit 24 to 25 degrees.

This could mean the current warm spell might be described as a ‘heat wave.’

Met Éireann meteorologist Gerry Murphy said for weather to be classified as a heat wave there must be five consecutive days of temperatures above 25 degrees.

The hottest day of the year so far was June 17th, when the mercury hit 27 degrees in Co Mayo. Mr. Murphy said temperatures this week “will possibly get close to that”.

According to Met Eireann the risk of sunburn this week is moderate to high.

“It’s important to let people know because more people will be out and about in the temperatures over the next few days,” said Mr Murphy.

Today there will be some outbreaks of rain in parts of Munster, Connacht and the midlands, which will continue to move eastwards.

Temperatures will range from 20 to 24 degrees. It will be warmest in the east.

It is expected to be dry in the east with some rain and drizzle at times in the west until Thursday, when there will be greater risk of widespread showers across the country. The possibility of thunderstorms will increase on Thursday.

“Given the fact that it will be warm and humid, you couldn’t rule out the odd thundery shower,” said Mr Murphy.

The pollen count will be moderate today and although it generally rises during prolonged dry spells.

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