Good summer weather set to continue

More of the same but health officials give advice on enjoying the sunshine

Making the most of the beautiful weather at O’Carrolls Cove, near Waterville Co Kerry yesterday. Photograph: Frank Miller

Making the most of the beautiful weather at O’Carrolls Cove, near Waterville Co Kerry yesterday. Photograph: Frank Miller

Wed, Jul 10, 2013, 09:11


It was dawn to dusk sunshine all over the country yesterday with temperatures peaking at nearly 30 degrees in some parts, according to Met Éireann.

It was the hottest day of the year and the highest temperature was recorded at Mount Dillon in Co Roscommon at 29.5 degrees.

Today temperatures are expected to be in the mid-20s to high-20s, and may even reach 30 degrees. Tomorrow is likely to bring more of the same, with temperatures at 22- 27 degrees.

Hot spells
Yesterday the HSE and Department of Health issued advice to make sure people enjoy the weather safely. They warned that during hot spells deaths in people aged 75 and over can rise by 60 per cent. Babies and young children are also at risk.

Acting spokesman for the Irish College of General Practitioners John Ball warned that people needed to take great caution to protect themselves from the sun. He said sunny spells “always catch people out for some reason”.

Cork County Council has appealed for people to restrict their use of water to essential purposes to ensure a continuous minimum supply.

Dublin City Council said it had no plans yet to restrict water access or reduce pressure.

Donegal County Council said it was putting in place water restrictions during off-peak periods starting last night and continuing until further notice. The supply is being turned off between 10pm and 7am in many places, including Castlefin and Crossroads.

In Dublin, Cork and Galway the Irish Skin Cancer Society’s (ISCS) UV index, a measure of the risk the sun poses to skin, will be at high between 12pm to 3pm from now until Friday. According to the ISCS, high means that there is a very real risk of skin and eye damage.

UV damage
ISCS health promotion officer Rosemary Scott said many people believed UV damage from the Irish sun was not harmful.

“All UV exposure increases your risk of skin cancer. Our message is to get out and enjoy the sun but, from April to September, whether you are on the beach, playing sports, gardening or working outdoors, never let your skin redden or burn.”