Families seek full disclosure over Dublin and Monaghan bombings

Survivors and relatives in legal action over alleged British collusion with loyalists

Members of the public tend to the injured following the detonation of a bomb on Talbot Street in Dublin in May 1974. Photograph: Tom Lawlor

Members of the public tend to the injured following the detonation of a bomb on Talbot Street in Dublin in May 1974. Photograph: Tom Lawlor

 

Survivors and relatives of victims of the Dublin and Monaghan bombings are seeking full disclosure in a legal action over alleged British government collusion with loyalists behind the attack.

They have requested a High Court order for the Ministy of Defence, Northern Ireland secretary and PSNI to serve their defences to claims lodged two years ago. Nearly 20 of the actions were listed together for the first time at a preliminary stage in the High Court on Monday.

Pregnant woman

The May 17th, 1974 bombings killed 33 people, including a pregnant woman, and left some 300 others injured. Nobody was ever charged with carrying out the attacks, which the Ulster Volunteer Force claimed responsibility for.

Solicitor Kevin Winters, of KRW Law, said outside court that the application was “significant because we cannot push for release of important materials until defences are filed”.

He said the legal process could be “terribly frustrating” for families bereaved during the Troubles and there was an obligation on all parties to try to expedite matters. “We anticipate the court putting in place a timetable for the next stages of the civil proceedings.”