Man sues Tusla to get information on sister in Tuam home

Girl who is believed to have been among 796 children who died in mother-and-baby home

Former Tuam home resident Peter Mulryan who was granted leave by High Court to bring action against Tusla. Photograph:  Peter Nicholls/Reuters

Former Tuam home resident Peter Mulryan who was granted leave by High Court to bring action against Tusla. Photograph: Peter Nicholls/Reuters

 

A Co Galway man seeking information about his infant sister who may have died in the Tuam mother and baby home has secured leave from the High Court to bring an action against Tusla.

Peter Mulryan’s sister Marian Bridget Mulryan is believed to be among the 796 children recorded as having died in the home.

He brought proceedings against Tusla, the child and family agency, in order to get any information that may exist about her.

Tusla says it has provided all information it is aware of and has also offered to allow Mr Mulryan, of Derrymullen, Ballinasloe, to inspect materials in its possession concerning the Tuam home.

Previously, the court heard Mr Mulryan went with his mother to the Tuam home just days after his birth in July 1944. His mother later appeared to have gone to a Magdalene institution and he was “boarded out” at the age of four.

He is seeking various orders and declarations from the court.

Legitimate expectation

Mr Mulryan seeks a declaration that communications sent to his solicitor in May, June and November 2016 cumulatively gave rise to a legitimate expectation that a social worker would assist Mr Mulryan by investigating all records in Tusla’s possession to ascertain what information it had about his sister.

He claims the documentation that should be investigated should include burial records, admission books, death certificates and documents concerning children sent to the US, Ireland or elsewhere for adoption that contain information and correspondence from the Tuam home relating to his sister.

After leave to bring the case was granted, Mr Higgins thanked the judge for the time he had put into considering the application.

Tusla said an offer to facilitate an inspection by Mr Mulryan of the material in its possession, including documents scanned by the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes , remained open.

The matter was adjourned for four weeks.