How to make a running comeback this September

Start slowly. Enjoy your first runs. The body will adapt if you give it just a little time

As another season gets set to start, Mary Jennings studies her feet

As another season gets set to start, Mary Jennings studies her feet

 

It’s never easy starting back. Whether it’s back-to-school or back-to-running, most of us would prefer another month of carefree summer days.

However, autumn is here, and the time is right to get moving. If you are a lapsed runner and would like to return to running, accept that starting out will be hard but once you have established the routine you will wonder why you left it so long to get started.

The Lapsed Runner

Very few of us stay running all the time. A sabbatical from running may be intentional due to an injury or illness but most often it can happen by accident. Skipping one run makes the next run easier to miss. A week off can quickly become a fortnight, and before we know it weeks can become months. The longer the break, the harder the comeback for the lapsed runner.

The Frustration

I have first-hand experience of frustrated lapsed runners this week as my running students return from their summer break. Those who left their running shoes in the wardrobe over the holidays struggle both mentally and physically compared with their peers. Not only has their fitness dropped, but their confidence and self-belief has taken a significant dip.

Accept where you are

Don’t get annoyed about the time you have had away from running and the fitness you have lost. We cannot peak all the time, and sometimes a break from running was the right decision. Instead of feeling guilty and annoyed with what you consider a setback, focus on getting started slowly again. I remind my runners that the body will adapt soon but needs a little time and gradual progress rather than speed as we return to the road.

The Build-up

Its normal to be apprehensive about the first run. We often doubt our ability and our strength to return to former fitness. We expect it to be uncomfortable at best. Many postpone the comeback as they cannot face the effort that will be required to return to their former running self. Certainly the first few weeks of adapting will be less comfortable than when we left off, but postponing the return to running any longer won’t help. Comebacks are hard but the sooner you start the easier it will be.

Getting Started

Set yourself up for success by making your first training session something that you know you can do. Make it very manageable and comfortable. Aim for 30 minutes outdoors combining walking and running all at a pace you can breathe comfortably at. Build a routine first and then focus on the distance. As the weeks progress the mileage and the speed will improve. The hardest part of the training session is the first few minutes so make them something to look forward to rather than fear.

Be Patient

A comeback can be short-lived if you set too high expectations. Do not compare with other runners or your previous running times and instead focus on your own body as it is today. Ensure your first few training sessions are enjoyable, positive and well within your fitness limits. Structure is key. Find a training plan, a coach or a running buddy to keep you accountable and on a steady track for the first few weeks and months. Don’t let the frustration or discomfort of the comeback send you back into another running hiatus.

The Alternative

If you don’t want to be a runner this autumn don’t put yourself under pressure to run. Instead find something that does interest and motivate you. Focus your energy on that. Don’t make running an additional stress in your life. You don’t have to run all the time. There will be months and maybe years when running is not right for you. If you are in that stage then accept it and leave your comeback until you are ready.

The Decision

However, if you are a little jealous of runners you see on the road and would like to join them, make the decision to move this September. Start small, keep it simple and don’t expect your body to enjoy it completely from the start. The fitness and confidence will return in time but only if you give your body and mind a chance to remember how good it feels to be a runner by building slowly, sensibly and gradually over the coming weeks.

The Fall Back

If things don’t go according to plan, next month we can start again when The Irish Times launches its Get Running programme. And don’t worry: there will be help, advice, tips and sustaining words on hand.

Mary Jennings is founder and running coach with ForgetTheGym.ie. Mary trains beginners and marathoners and everyone in between to enjoy running and stay injury-free.

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