Dressing down: When I was training, interns were supposed to look like Leonardo DiCaprio in The Great Gatsby, all pink cheeks and white coat. Now they look like DiCaprio in The Revenant, just after the bear got at him

Pat Harrold: At last doctors are dressing appropriately for our jobs

You try to practise good, scientific-based medicine, with good evidence for everything, and give your best

The graduate entry scheme at Limerick University has a special emphasis on primary care-centred learning

Jack Kyle – rugby player and surgeon – scores against France in Belfast, 1953

Medical Matters: Cricketers make good anaesthetists, footballers are excellent shrinks

A GP on his patients: you get over the shock that patients don’t take their tablets or tell you they smoke. Photograph: Anthony Devlin/PA

The longer you practise medicine, the less surprised you are by anything

Donald Trump:  like a smoker or an alcoholic, he has surrounded himself with bad friends, known as enablers. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump's denial of climate change endangers us all

Doctors and nurses in the Mater hospital. There is a case to made for intensive management of  patients with chronic conditions who soak up an inordinate amount of the health budget by neglecting their medications and missing appointments.

We have one of the most expensive healthcare systems in world but it does not deliver

It’s time to #DropOffSwitchOff in Ireland.

You wouldn’t light a cigarette when near a child, so what’s different about car fumes?

It’s time to #DropOffSwitchOff in Ireland.

You wouldn’t light a cigarette when near a child, so what’s different about car fumes?

If you have  trouble  sleeping, learn to relax   instead of taking tablets.  Photograph: iStockphoto

If you have trouble sleeping, why would you take tablets instead of learning to relax?

When you become coeliac you realise how often you think of food, confront food or have food pushed at you by advertising.  Photograph: iStockphoto

GP Pat Harrold has found out he can’t take gluten, so beer – aka bread in a jar – is off the menu

“Seeing a plump child on the scales today, the GP sees their future: diabetes, sleep apnoea, heart problems, high blood pressure, joint disease and low self-esteem.” Photograph: Jimmy Pozarik/Getty Images

It is hard to get message across to children, particularly if their parents are overweight

. Children’s tummies are small, so if they fill themselves up with a sugary drink, they will not feel like eating meals. Photograph: Thinkstock

Tooth loss, obesity, missing meals and insomnia are among the possibilities writes Dr Pat Harrold

Operation Resuscitation is teaching a Co Kerry community to do CPR and use a defibrillator

‘To work like a machine, joylessly and without soul, is also known as being burned out’

Is the life of a person in a rural community less valuable than the life of a city dweller? The Government and the HSE seem to thi(...)

Climate issues are too important to leave to big business and politicians

Medical students are now learning the fascinating art of communication skills

Many doctors are uncertain of their future and suspect this is the best deal, while others disagree with the plan in principle

You have to put an awful lot into medicine to have any sort of decent life, says Dr Pat Harrold

Some of the old timers worked hard, lived hard and left legends behind them

It was the 1980s and Paul Simon’s Graceland had put African music in the charts. Medical students like me raised money to go to wo(...)

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