Banksy art sold for $60 on New York street

Stall sells signed works worth tens of thousands to unsuspecting buyers

Work from street artist Banksy is seen through a chain link fence last week in the Lower East Side neighbourhood of New York City.Photograph: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Work from street artist Banksy is seen through a chain link fence last week in the Lower East Side neighbourhood of New York City.Photograph: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Mon, Oct 14, 2013, 12:37

Signed canvases worth tens of thousands of euro by elusive British artist Banksy were sold at a stall on the New York streets for just $60 (€44) in recent days.

Unbeknownst to those passing by a Central Park “spray art” stall, the works on display, which looked like copies of Banksy’s works, were originals.

In a video post on his website dated October 13th Banksy wrote: “ Yesterday I set up a stall in the park selling 100 per cent authentic original signed Banksy canvases. For $60 each.”

Video: Banksy street stall

Just three people bought the black and white Banksy bargain works from the older man at the stall over the course of a day.

The video shows the man sitting at the stall, titled “Spray Art”, for most of the day with no customers as people pass. At 3.30pm the stall made its first sale as a woman bought two small canvasses for her children, negotiating them down to half price.

At 4pm a woman from New Zealand bought two of the art works. At 5.30pm a man from Chicago bought four. According to the video commentary he was decorating his house and said he “just needs something for the walls”. By 6pm the Banksy “spray art” stall closed with a total taking of $420.

However New Yorkers hoping get another chance to buy cut-price art will be disappointed. Banksy said this was a once off , writing “Please note: This was a one off. The stall will not be there again today.”

Earlier this month the graffiti artists announced on his website that he is undertaking “an artist’s residency on the streets of New York”.

Although he is not providing exact locations, those who spot the graffiti are spreading the word online to aid other fans in the treasure hunt.

Banksy, who refuses to give his real name,began his career in Bristol spray-painting local buildings. His works now fetch thousands of euro around the world, but many of his street paintings have been defaced, destroyed or removed.