Malaysia says flight MH370 crashed in sea

Data shows Malaysian Airlines jet ended in southern Indian Ocean, says Malaysian PM

Family members of passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 cry after watching a television broadcast of a news conference, in the Lido hotel in Beijing, yesterday. Photograph: Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

Family members of passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines MH370 cry after watching a television broadcast of a news conference, in the Lido hotel in Beijing, yesterday. Photograph: Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

Tue, Mar 25, 2014, 06:23


The last hopes of finding survivors from the missing Malaysia Airlines aircraft ended yesterday with the announcement it had crashed into the southern Indian Ocean with all lives lost.

A statement by Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak concluded an anguished 17-day wait for families of the 239 passengers and crew, who had longed for a miracle, but brought them no closer to understanding why flight MH370 vanished en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8th. The location of the Boeing 777 also remains unknown despite an international hunt.

Ten aircraft are combing a huge patch of the southern Indian Ocean, about 2,500km southwest of the Australian city of Perth. More ships are on their way and the US is dispatching a specialised device to help locate aircraft flight data and cockpit voice recorders.


Analysis of satellite data
Mr Razak told a press conference that new analysis of satellite data showed the aircraft’s last position was over a remote area of the ocean west of Perth and far from any possible landing sites.

“It is therefore with deep sadness and regret that I must inform you that according to this new data, flight MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean,” he said, adding that further details would be issued today. “For [families] the past few weeks have been heart-breaking. I know this news must be harder still.”

Malaysia Airlines informed relatives of the news by text message about half an hour before the public statement. The company said that “the majority” were told in person and by phone.

The message – sent in English only, although two-thirds of the passengers were Chinese – read: “We deeply regret that we have to assume beyond any reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived.”

Distraught relatives of Chinese passengers attacked Malaysia for announcing the loss of life without direct proof and for wasting the best chance to rescue those on board.

In a statement, they said the airline, Malaysian government and its military had “continually and extremely delayed, hidden and covered the facts, and attempted to deceive the passengers’ relatives, and people all over the world”.

That had not only devastated relatives but “misled, delayed the research and rescue, wasted a lot of manpower and material resources and we lost the most valuable rescue opportunity. If our 154 relatives lost their lives because of it, Malaysia Airlines, the Malaysian government, and the Malaysian military are [their] killers.”