Troika ‘started with view Ireland deserved what it got’

Tánaiste marks bailout end and says Coalition eventually gained trust

Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore sharing his views on Ireland’s exit from the EU-IMF programme at the Institute of International and European Affairs in Dublin on Friday. Photograph: Frank Miller/The Irish Times

Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore sharing his views on Ireland’s exit from the EU-IMF programme at the Institute of International and European Affairs in Dublin on Friday. Photograph: Frank Miller/The Irish Times

Sat, Dec 14, 2013, 18:16

The troika leaders who arrived for bailout talks three years ago initially took a view that “Ireland, to some extent, deserved what it got”, Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore said.

Marking the exit from the bailout programme this weekend, Mr Gilmore said today he believed the troika “ kind of had a view of Ireland that was not very sympathetic” but that this had changed over time.

“They saw it as a country where this property bubble, this mad speculation had gone on, lack of regulation in banking. To some extent I think they felt that we were the authors of our own misfortune,” he said.

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Speaking on RTÉ’s The Business programme, he said that had changed over time as the troika leaders “built a trust in us”.

“They saw that we were serious about the recovery, that we were serious about working the programme, that we were serious about doing it within the timeframe, that we were serious about this exit and that we were going to do what was necessary, we were going to take the difficult decisions.

“And as they became more confident that we were serious about economic recovery, they became more relaxed and more willing to make changes in the programme itself and indeed to make it a bit easier for us to do it, ultimately.”

Mr Gilmore also insisted the Government coult not be accused of “opportunist politics”.

Questioned about possible income tax cuts in the wake of Ireland’s exit from the EU-IMF bailout tomorrow.

Mr Gilmore said the Coalition had taken some of the most difficult decisions that any government had had to take in the history of the State, in order to save the economy and turn it around.

“We are not going to put that recovery at risk. We are going to see that that recovery is embedded,” he said.

“We have to be careful about what is said at this stage. We have to look at the work that now needs to be done. To work to complete the reduction of the deficit and to increase employment.

The Coalition would also see that the recovery is not used “for some tiny elite or not going back to days of speculation, but that the recovery is used to benefit the broad section of the Irish population who bore the burden of the retrenchment that had to be made to make it possible”.

He said that “that means that people have to be able to have employment, have to be able to see that they can aspire again to an improved living standard”.

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