A tenfold increase in current donations is required to deal with Ebola virus

Opinion: Existing technologies and organisational structures could prevent a widespread outbreak in Ireland

‘A comparative Irish context could be Carndonagh in Donegal or Ballybay in Monaghan, in 1830s. There is a strong belief in the ‘cure’, faith in traditional healers, loud and long wakes around the body of our loved dead, and a pre-enlightenment animist view of the world.’ Above, girls look at a poster, distributed by UNICEF, bearing information on and illustrations of best practices that help prevent the spread of Ebola virus disease, in the city of Voinjama, in Lofa County, Liberia. Photograph: Ahmed Jallanzo/UNICEF/Reuters

‘A comparative Irish context could be Carndonagh in Donegal or Ballybay in Monaghan, in 1830s. There is a strong belief in the ‘cure’, faith in traditional healers, loud and long wakes around the body of our loved dead, and a pre-enlightenment animist view of the world.’ Above, girls look at a poster, distributed by UNICEF, bearing information on and illustrations of best practices that help prevent the spread of Ebola virus disease, in the city of Voinjama, in Lofa County, Liberia. Photograph: Ahmed Jallanzo/UNICEF/Reuters

Wed, Aug 6, 2014, 00:01

Ebola is terrifying. It brings fever, fatigue, oozing blood and forebodings of dying. Since December 2013, an outbreak of Ebola virus disease has spread in west Africa. Control interventions have failed. Ebola is spreading to new villages, new counties, and to other countries; last week to Nigeria.

Many health workers have caught it through work and died. Those left behind are tired, exhausted and loosing hope. They have seen their peers and their leaders dying while trying to help, with inadequate resources, lack of staff, and overwhelming failure.

The traditional subsistence farming families who live in the border districts in rural Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, come from places called Gueckedou, Kailahun, Kenema, Koindu and Kono. A comparative Irish context could be Carndonagh in Donegal or Ballybay in Monaghan, in the 1830s.

Traditional healers

There is a strong belief in the “cure”, faith in traditional healers, loud and long wakes around the body of the loved dead, and a pre-Enlightenment animist view of the world. The old chiefdom families try to hold on to power in the local courts. MPs make laws in an unknown language. A paid police force is thrown in from faraway. There is a distrust of the national forces of law and order and an aversion towards centralised power. There are powerful secret societies – the Bundu and the Poro, for women and for men – each with initiation rites, songs, dances, lore and drama. The Kankoran, the dancing, hunting devil, inspires fear, respect and conformity, but also reassurance – it will protect people from all harm, as it has done during the civil war.

While the culture and social structures are attractive in some ways, there is widespread poverty. There is unmechanised, hard, physical work, with Iron Age tools for some, growing rice, cassava or maize. The youth dream of successful emigration and try to travel across to Spain, London or New York.

Healthwise, west Africa is dire by modern standards, again not unlike Ireland in 1830s. One woman in 100 dies during each childbirth. Five years ago, a Sierra Leone ministry of health presentation I attended described how six in every 100 pregnant women going into the Princess Christian maternity hospital in Freetown died there, due to the six traditional perinatal killers: sepsis, pre- eclampsia, ante-partum haemorrhage, post-partum haemorrhage, obstructed labour and ruptured uterus.

Last resort

The basics of scientific obstetric care were absent in the hospital. Most mothers deliver at home. Going to the state-run hospital is a last resort for the desperate.

Food insecurity occurs annually. During the hungry season people die, first the little children and elderly. There is rarely clean running water, reliable electricity or good roads. This is one of the least-developed places on our planet.

Presidents Ernest Koroma, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Alpha Conde of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea have appealed for help to deal with the Ebola outbreak.

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