Traditional Irish cottage in Kilkenny for €150,000

The two-bedroom 1790 house near Waterford has been renovated to a high standard

This traditional whitewashed thatched Irish cottage was built in 1790.

This traditional whitewashed thatched Irish cottage was built in 1790.

 

This postcard-pretty house in the Kilkenny countryside, a traditional whitewashed thatched Irish cottage built in 1790, could be a romantic hideaway for jaded city folk. The couple who bought it seven years ago have renovated the house in sympathy with its original style: it has exposed timber beams, lime-plastered internal walls painted white and a wood-burning stove in the fireplace with a timber mantel.

A pretty country garden surrounds the cottage, which is on a country road 7km from Waterford city. It’s on an elevated site with views over surrounding countryside towards Kilkenny’s Tory Hill.

The detached house is on about one-third of an acre in the townland of Curluddy, Carrigeen, Co Kilkenny. The two-bedroom cottage is about 93sq m (1,000sq ft) and is for sale through REA O’Shea O’Toole for €150,000.

The livingroom is floored with a combination of tiles and oak and a kitchen with fitted timber units, a Belfast sink and the wood-burning stove. There’s a small bedroom downstairs, and a tiled bathroom with a shower. An open staircase leads from the kitchen to a loft bedroom that looks down into the kitchen/dining area.

Outside is a well-planted garden, terraced to take advantage of views of the countryside. There is a number of outbuildings that the agent suggests could be renovated and attached to the original house, subject to planning permission.

The house has been rewired and replumbed, has mains water, a septic tank and is heated by the kitchen stove as well as electric convector heaters.

The townland of Curluddy is in the Suir valley. The house is 1.5km from the village of Carrigeen, which has a food store, school, sports club and church.

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