Nourishment for a natural change of life

The menopause need not be the end of the world as you know it – some diet changes will go a long way to help

Women are best to ensure an adequate intake of vitamin E from food, such as nuts, rather than from supplements as a general rule. Photograph: Thinkstock Women are best to ensure an adequate intake of vitamin E from food, like nuts, rather than from supplements as a general rule. Photograph: Thinkstock

Women are best to ensure an adequate intake of vitamin E from food, such as nuts, rather than from supplements as a general rule. Photograph: Thinkstock Women are best to ensure an adequate intake of vitamin E from food, like nuts, rather than from supplements as a general rule. Photograph: Thinkstock

Tue, Aug 12, 2014, 01:00

Once a taboo subject, the menopause was for many years incorrectly associated with mood swings, overwhelming depression and the loss of sexual desire.

Only recently, these negative stereotypes have begun to crumble, according to the Harvard Guide to Women’s Health. Consequently, the menopause is increasingly seen as a natural part of life, with both positive and negative aspects.

There are considerable differences in women’s descriptions of how they first began to identify themselves as menopausal. We normally experience the menopause when other stresses are present, so it is difficult to unravel the impact of other life events from symptoms associated with the menopause. Typical stresses at this stage in life include worries related to teenage or adult children, our own health problems, ailing parents, moving house or separation.

Many of us will visit the GP and have the menopause medically confirmed. Even if we haven’t seen a doctor for some time, this is a good time to have a quick check-up and discuss symptoms, recommended tests (such as a bone DXA scan), a management plan or treatment options if necessary.

Hot flushes are a common symptom of menopause, making some women feel self- conscious or panicked. A small number of Irish participants in the Women’s Experiences and Understandings of Menopause study reported very frequent flushes, some every 15 minutes.

Night sweats or episodes of perspiring can affect many women’s sleep. The associated sleep deprivation can leave women and their partners exhausted.

It is no surprise that weight can creep up during this time of emotional, physical and social change. Nibbling, comfort snacking or relaxing with an additional glass of wine instead of a quick walk can end up in a slight increase in calories. Women frequently report a difference in fat distribution after menopause. They concentrate fat more in the abdomen and above the waist, whereas before the menopause they were prone to fat deposits on the hips and thighs.

In general we need fewer calories as we get older. As we become less active, we lose muscle mass and our metabolism slows. Whether weight gain is linked to the menopause itself or to our declining activity, studies demonstrate that weight gain during these years can be prevented by lifestyle improvements in exercise and diet.

Minimising fat gain and maintaining muscle by means of a combination of resistance and aerobic exercise help with hormonal challenges. Women with a normal body mass index report fewer hot flushes and have a better quality of life.

 

Supplements

It would be great if there was a quick fix for the hot flushes, night sweats, exhaustion, accumulating work and growing irritation. A lot of money is spent in the hope that botanical extracts and supplements will help, but their effectiveness is limited.

Certain supplements on the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database look promising, but women should be aware of the lack of conclusive scientific evidence and of when not to use them. For example, taking 15mg of a genistein extract from soya bean every day may reduce the number and severity of hot flushes, but a woman who has had breast cancer or who has a family history of breast cancer should not take these supplements without consulting a medical herbalist. The same applies to red clover, another source of phytoestrogen. This should be avoided if your medicines include either a blood thinner or tamoxifen.

Certain foods naturally contain these phytonutrients and a myriad of other nutrients essential for overall health. Postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of heart disease, bone loss and certain cancers. If woman ensure a good supply of fruits, vegetables (especially legumes), seafood, poultry and lean meat, low-fat dairy, wholegrains, nuts and seeds, this helps to manage not only their menopause symptoms but their immune, cardiovascular and bone health too.

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