Sweet potato, spinach and feta frittata

Sweet potato, spinach and feta frittata with yoghurt and sumac. Photograph: Aidan Crawley

Sweet potato, spinach and feta frittata with yoghurt and sumac. Photograph: Aidan Crawley

Sat, Aug 3, 2013, 01:00

   
  • Serves: 6
  • Cooking Time: 50 mins
  • Course: Main Course
  • Cuisine: Italian

Ingredients

  • 300g sweet potato (which is one or two, depending on size)
  • 80ml olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 1 red onion, peeled and sliced
  • Little squeeze honey or pinch sugar
  • 1 bag baby spinach (approx 120g)
  • 1 pack feta, diced (approx 200g)
  • 12 eggs, beaten
  • 2-3 tbsp Greek yoghurt
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and crushed
  • Few pinches sumac/smoked sweet paprika

Method

This would heartily serve four to six people for dinner, but would also make about 20 lovely pieces that you could serve as tapas style treats.

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees/gas 4. Cube the sweet potato, about the size of small dice, skin and all, and put on to parchment paper on a roasting tray. Pour over about a quarter of the olive oil, season well and roast for about 20 minutes until the cubes are just starting to brown and are tender.

In a large, oven-proof frying pan, sweat the red onion with the remaining olive oil and season well. Do this very slowly and add a little honey to accentuate the sweetness. Add the spinach and let it wilt slightly, then take it off the heat. Scatter the cooked, roast sweet potatoes on top, along with the feta. Give a cursory stir and then add the beaten eggs. You need to make sure all the goodies are evenly distributed and that the egg can permeate into all the nooks and crannies. Then bake in the oven until firm. This can take about 25-30 minutes, but remember that the egg will keep on cooking as it cools down.

I like to eat this at room temperature, sliced and dotted with the flavoured Greek yoghurt which you make by simply mixing the garlic and yoghurt with some salt and pepper and then sprinkling with sumac or sweet paprika.

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