In praise of Anne Enright, by Nuala Ní Chonchúir

Celebrating Irish women writers: ‘She writes a kind of Irishness that is close to the bone: honest, hilarious, melancholic and a little bit painful to read. She is particularly good on women’s lives and thought processes’

Anne Enright rings home to give her husband the news that she had just been awarded the Davy Byrnes Irish Writing Award 2004. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

Anne Enright rings home to give her husband the news that she had just been awarded the Davy Byrnes Irish Writing Award 2004. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

 

Anne Enright is one of the writers who made me want to write well. I read her short story collection The Portable Virgin early on as a writer and thought, “I’m allowed write about Irish women and be wicked, funny and literary all at the same time? Great!”

She writes a kind of Irishness that is close to the bone: honest, hilarious, melancholic and a little bit painful to read. She is particularly good on women’s lives and thought processes. I love her non-fiction book on childbirth and motherhood Making Babies – it offers a fresh, forthright perspective on the confusing business of pregnancy and children. Equally, I enjoyed The Pleasure of Eliza Lynch, Enright’s historical novel based on a real Irish woman who went to Paraguay as the lover of a dictator. It’s bawdy, sensuous, full of gorgeous detail, and told in Enright’s stylised, audacious prose.

Anne Enright is the perfect writer for our times: she is opinionated, articulate, thoughtful, humorous, questioning, lyrical, literary, stylish and honest. She will do us proud as our inaugural Laureate for Fiction.

Other favourites: Edna O’Brien and Elizabeth Bowen

“You have to write through a great sense of loss, or impending loss, towards the end of a book, but there is also a gathering inevitability that makes ending it inescapable. I am never happy with a finished book, but I know that it is finished more or less…When you have changed all the semi-colons to dashes and back again, the thing is done. But it is never right."
Anne Enright

Under her birth name, Nuala O’Connor, Nuala Ní Chonchúir’s third novel, Miss Emily, about Emily Dickinson and her Irish maid, appears this summer from Penguin USA, Penguin Canada and Sandstone Press, UK.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.