Having trouble getting your emails read?

Here are a couple of hints on getting your message across

The competition for attention in the in-box is fierce, with people often receiving and sending more than 100 emails a day.

The competition for attention in the in-box is fierce, with people often receiving and sending more than 100 emails a day.

Fri, Jul 25, 2014, 06:45

Ensure that your email gets the attention it deserves by using these age-old persuasion techniques to craft a message that will prompt a response.

The competition for attention in the in-box is fierce, with people often receiving and sending more than 100 emails a day. Luckily, crafting messages that encourage people to read and act on them is relatively easy. Before you start typing, consider your objective: know exactly what you want to achieve with your email.

Take advantage of the subject line Most of us already use the subject line to explain the “what,” (“Re: monthly financials”), but it’s also the place to build a personal bridge (“Re: monthly financials, per Peter’s request”) and indicate urgency (“Re: monthly financials, per Peter’s request. Need feedback by Tuesday”).

Be bold, and use bold Place the most important request or information at the top, then put it in bold. If you’re emailing multiple people, bold the names of anyone you address directly so that person immediately connects to the content relevant to them.

Watch the clock Time the delivery for maximum impact. Never send an email at the end of the day or the start of a weekend. Make sure recipients open it when they have time to read it.

Tell the recipient what you need If you want people to get back to you or take action, put the request in bold. Make clear what you need from the recipient.

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