Lingering affection: no sign of curtains falling on profits of Cranberries company

Curtain Call Ltd recorded profits of €71,973 in 2011

The Cranberries in their heyday. Their  sixth album, Roses, was released last year, and if its sales are anything to go by the band will continue to profit

The Cranberries in their heyday. Their sixth album, Roses, was released last year, and if its sales are anything to go by the band will continue to profit

Tue, Apr 9, 2013, 06:00

Song sales may have gone online, and traditional music stores may have gone out of business in the 23 years since the Cranberries formed, but the final curtain hasn’t fallen on their profits just yet.

The Irish band’s company Curtain Call Ltd recorded profits of €71,973 in 2011 proving there’s certainly no zombies in their heads.

Along with nearly every other band whose members went their separate ways during the late 1990s and early 2000s, The Cranberries reformed in 2009. The following year, their company recorded profits of €248,183.

The company’s cash increased from €53,116 to €104,293 in 2011, while its accumulated profits rose from €206,837 to €278,810.

Each of the band’s four members – Dolores O’Riordan, Noel Hogan, Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawler – has a 25 per cent stake in Curtain Call.

The band’s sixth album, Roses , their first studio release in 10 years, was released last year, and if its sales are anything to go by the band will continue to profit from their music.

The album debuted at No 6 on the Canadian Albums Chart, 13 on Germany’s official music charts and 3 on the Irish Indie charts.