Jim Carroll

Music, Life and everything else

The randomiser has some reading to do before the bank holiday weekend

Twitter? Facebook? LinkedIn? Pah, so 2009 the lot of ‘em. It’s all about Diaspora and Chime In for OTR these days. Meanwhile, let’s not forget Foursquare: it may not have taken off Over Here as much as it did Over …

Wed, Oct 26, 2011, 08:51

   

Twitter? Facebook? LinkedIn? Pah, so 2009 the lot of ‘em. It’s all about Diaspora and Chime In for OTR these days. Meanwhile, let’s not forget Foursquare: it may not have taken off Over Here as much as it did Over There but it’s definitely still king of its own frontier.

You know social media has jumped the shark when live music lads start to wonder if they can leverage the aul’ Twitter to sell tickets. The rest of the Billboard Touring Conference will hopefully concentrate on how to spot when the promoter is purchasing the backstage rider from Aldi or Lidi and a guide to hoodwinking tour managers at settlement time.

And speaking of social media, whatever happened to your friend Tom from MySpace?

Nile Rodgers was one of my favourite interviewees from the last few years (how it could not be with tales of Sesame Street, the Black Panthers and sex on airplanes?) so I reckon his autobiography Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco, and Destiny is going to be a must-read book too.

This is what the new record business looks like to our friends at The Economist. And, yes, label execs are also all up in yo’ grill about social media.

Sigur Ros have always said no to the Mad Men in red braces looking to use their music in ads. Yet, the band still come across some interesting, er, tributes to their sound. Here’s a selection which, per the band, put the fromage in homage.

Lovely piece from Roy Wilkinson on managing his brothers’ band British Sea Power and dealing their zealous fan – their dad. Contains the brilliant line “”Do it for your mum! Do it for the Butthole Surfers!”

Huzzah, another first world problem solved

Brian Eno on bizarre instruments: “the Telharmonium was built by a man called Thaddeus Cahill in 1906. He built three versions and the biggest weighed 200 tons. However, it was probably the first truly portable electronic music instrument. It was carried in 30 railway carriages and it was a series of tone-wheel generators, a little bit like a Hammond organ, though in a Hammond the generators were about 1.6in in diameter whereas in the Telharmonium they were 8ft tall.”

Def Jam, the lotus position years. After three minutes of meditation, Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons discuss the life and times of “the last great record label”.

Good interview with John Doran from the excellent site The Quietus

Alternative career guide: how to be a top-ranking go-to TV soundtrack guy (or gal)

From crowdsourcing to crime sourcing – the rise of distributed criminality

New-school jazz-meisters to the stage please: Improvised Music Company and Jazz Kitchen’s next Whirligig session featuring new capital city jazzers OKO, Zoiband, Thought-Fox and Umbra happens at the Grand Social on November 2. Admission is €12 or €10, depending on how many Charles Lloyd albums you own and actually listen to.

A date for Bank Holiday Sunday: Sound Now, Seek & You Will FInd is a special celebration of Arthur Russell’s life and music with performances from Angkorwat, Patrick Kelleher, School Tour, TR One, Quarter Inch Tape Collective, Conor L, David Kitt and Louis Scully plus The Eatyard food festival and an exhibition of Arthur Russell memorabilia. I’ll be having a Banter conversation with Tim Lawrence, the author of the fantastic “Hold Onto Your Dreams” biography of Russell (and the excellent “Love Saves the Day” history of 1970s’ American dance culture). It happens at the Bernard Shaw in Dublin, admission is free and proceedings get underway at 2pm.

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