A Thompson submachine gun: The IRA were the first customers for the gun, designed in 1919 by Gen John T Thompson.

During 1920, the IRA developed its tactics as the war progressed, attacking RIC barracks and towards the end of the year creating flying columns and a(...)

Tom Barry: While his IRA activities have been well-covered by historians, relatively little is known about the factors that led him to embark on the road to rebellion.

On November 28th, 1920, a mobile patrol of Auxiliaries was ambushed and destroyed by an IRA flying column led by Tom Barry at Kilmichael, Co Cork. The(...)

The Burning of Cork on December 11th, 1920. Photograph courtesy of the National Library of Ireland.

With the benefit of hindsight at 100 years remove, and taken in the context of escalating violence and tension throughout that year, it was hardly sur(...)

British authorities fear trouble in Dublin, and refuse to allow Terence MacSwiney’s remains go anywhere near the Irish capital. Instead, his coffin is put on the steamer Rathmore at Holyhead in Wales, and sent directly to Cork under military guard. However, a planned requiem Mass still goes ahead in Dublin’s Pro-Cathedral. And this is the planned funeral procession through Sackville Street, (now O’Connell Street) Dublin on October 29th, 1920. Photograph courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

January 2nd: The War of Independence begins in earnest with an attack on Carrigtwohill RIC barracks in Co Cork. January 15th: Sinn Féin has major su(...)

GAA president John Horan with Tom Ryan, director general GAA, and Monsignor Eoin Thynne at the unveiling of headstones on the graves of Jerome O’Leary (10), Michael Feery (40) and Patrick O’Dowd (57) who were among the 14 people killed at Croke Park on  Bloody Sunday. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

By mid-morning on Sunday, November 21st, 1920, the centre of Dublin had plunged headlong into wild chaos. All around Dublin Castle, the traditional se(...)

Brenda Malone, curator of IRA Intelligence File at the National Museum of Ireland, with hair believed to have been sheared, and found in the possession of Michael Barry when arrested in 1920, is among items which appear in the exhibition Irish Wars 1919 to 1923 at the National Museum of Ireland, Collins Barracks, Dublin. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Evidence that violence perpetrated against women was an integral aspect of the conflict during the War of Independence and has only belatedly been ack(...)

An armoured car at Mountjoy Prison, Dublin, during Republican hunger strike protests in April 1920. Photograph courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

The War of Independence is best remembered for the events of 1920. This was the year of Bloody Sunday; the burnings of Cork, Balbriggan and Trim; the (...)

British soldiers guard a barricade, probably during the Irish War of Independence, circa 1920. Photograph: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

In the immediate aftermath of the Civil War, the father of a British soldier sent a letter from his home in Stretford, Manchester, to Ireland seeking (...)

Liam Neeson as Michael Collins

The Irish War of Independence was both a political struggle and a military conflict. Militarily, the two sides appeared unfairly matched. By 1921, the(...)

The front page of French newspaper Le Petit Journal, December 5th, 1920, depicting British police attacking a farm in Tipperary occupied by Sinn Féin members. Photograph: Leemage/UIG via Getty Images

There was more than one war of independence being fought in Ireland in 1920. Alongside an increasingly intense military conflict, there were political(...)

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