Wilfred Owen

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David Brophy: conducted a moving performance of Britten’s War Requiem at the National Concert Hall to commemorate Armistice Day

The musical commemoration of the dead goes back not centuries but millennia; though, of course, we have no way of knowing what most of this early musi(...)

Soldier and war poet Wilfred Owen, in uniform, with a young boy, circa 1917. Photograph:  Evening Standard/Getty Images

Of all the poets to die in the first World War, the fate of Wilfred Owen may have been the most cruel, if only for his family. He survived until the l(...)

Soldier Still is at Project Arts Centre Sept 9th to 14th as part of Dublin Fringe Festival

Since ancient times, movement, in the form of close order drill, helped shape a rabble of individuals into a mass military unit. But it can also help (...)

Trigger-happy Trump?: USS Porter fires a Tomahawk missile at Syria from the Mediterranean. Photograph: Seaman Ford Williams/US Navy/PA Wire

Donald Trump’s sudden decision to launch 59 Tomahawk missiles at a Syrian airbase is a classic case of doing the right thing for the wrong reasons. In(...)

Aine Miller reads at the  Francis Ledwidge commemorative festival at Islandbridge in 1997. Ledwidge, a nationalist poet, was in Dublin during the very week of the Easter Rising, having recovered in England from serious injuries incurred while fighting in the British army in the first World War

The history of recent conflict in Ireland is usually traced to the early years of the twentieth century, and the key figure who determined the way (...)

Irish poet and soldier Francis Ledwidge (1891 - 1917). Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

I first heard the name of the Meath poet Francis Ledwidge in a Dublin classroom in 1966 – central to that year’s schoolday preoccupations was learning(...)

Irish outlook: George Bernard Shaw. Photograph: Ullstein Bild via Getty

In June 1915 WB Yeats wrote to his American friend and patron John Quinn about the Great War then raging across Europe. It was, he said, “merely th(...)

Mainstays of modernism: Ezra Pound, the attorney John Quinn, Ford Maddox Ford and James Joyce in Pound’s Paris studio in 1923. Photograph from Joyce Images, by Bob Cato and Greg Vitiello with an introduction by Anthony Burgess (Norton, 1994)

In April 1940, as the second World War intensified, British novelist Virginia Woolf gave a lecture to the Workers’ Educational Association in Brigh(...)

Jennifer Johnston’s How Many Miles to Babylon? – Nomad Theatre stage version including  Fergal McElherron and Sam Peter Corry – represented important attempts to re-examine the first World War and its legacy. Photograph: Colm Henry

War is ambivalent; for the powers that decide to wage it, it is as ancient as man, even older than Homer and is caused by expansionist greed and do(...)

Desolation: part of Zonnebeke, painted in 1918 by William Orpen. Courtesy of the Imperial War Museum

Ireland, poetry and the first World War is a story of contradictions, of contrasts and, a century later, of reconciliation. It should not pass us b(...)

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