Wesley Gray

10 results

Bill Miller. Had he retired in 2006, everyone “would have thought I was a genius”, he said last year. “By 2009, I was like an idiot.” Photograph: Heidi Gutman/Getty Images

One of the most important determinants of investment success is also one of the most underappreciated – luck. The investors who enjoy the cosiest ret(...)

Warren Buffett:  was written off in the late 1990s only to come roaring back when the technology bubble burst. Photograph: Rick Wilking/Reuters

Value investing – buying cheap, less fashionable stocks and shunning glamorous but expensive companies – is as old as the hills. Warren Buffett and ma(...)

New York Stock Exchange: Goldman says a variety of risks could catalyse a 5-10 per cent drawdown in the coming months. Photograph: Carlo Allegri/Reuters

Underestimating closet tracker funds problem Closet index funds may be a much bigger problem than European regulators have suggested. In February, a(...)

Rain storm outside the New York Stock Exchange: declines are part of investing in stocks. Photograph: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg

It’s easy to feel a bit foolish during a bear market, especially when the “I told you so” brigade point out how you could have protected your portfoli(...)

“Apple may well prove a value trap – who knows? – but the notion ‘value stocks in tech just do not work’ is pure fiction.” Photograph: Aly Song/Reuters

Bear market a reality for many investors A renewed bout of China-induced nervousness resulted in stocks selling off hard last week, triggering the us(...)

Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange: even novice investors can grasp the simple logic underpinning the case for diversification. Photograph: REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Everyone knows the old cliché about not putting all your eggs in one basket. A diversified portfolio might consist of different asset classes such as (...)

More than just a name change for Google What’s in a name? About $30 billion in the case of Google/Alphabet, judging by last week’s upbeat market react(...)

 Number crunching: mechanical models to predict stock market performance have shown to be consistently better than expert opinion. Photographer: Jin Lee/Bloomberg

Simple computer models invariably trump expert human judgment, whether predicting wine prices, making medical diagnoses, analysing job performa(...)

You heard it here first: A trader  on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Photograph: Brendan McDermid/Reuters

Not that long ago, investors looking for their daily fix of market analysis had to make do with broker notes and market summaries in the mainst(...)

Stock picking: Investors often buy into a story, and forget to look for evidence to back up their assumptions.

Most of us are “predictably irrational”, to quote behavioural finance author Dan Ariely, relying all too often on a dodgy sense of intuition an(...)