A who’s who of Irish revolutionary figures passed through no6 Harcourt Street, but the man most associated with it was Michael Collins who directed the Dáil loan from his room on the second floor. Photograph: Ronan McGreevy

If any building could be considered to be the home of the Irish revolution, that building would be 6 Harcourt Street. For four years it was the home(...)

Leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party John Redmond (left) with John Dillon, who succeeded him as leader, circa 1910. Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

In January 1918, the Daily Mail referred to the “increasing weakness” of Sinn Féin – a reminder that as far as some contemporary observers were concer(...)

A demonstrator waves a Catalan separatist flag in Madrid, Spain. Photograph: Paul Hanna/Reuters

In seeking to smash the ballot boxes and the voters in last Sunday’s referendum on independence for Catalonia, the Spanish authorities inevitably scor(...)

Eamon de Valera, in addressing the League of Nations when the Irish Free State held the presidency of the League Council, highlighted his disquiet about the larger powers dominating international organisations

In 1922, after the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty, Joseph Walshe, who had worked during the War of Independence in Sinn Féin’s Irish foreign servic(...)

Maeve Brennan during her years as a staff writer at the New Yorker magazine, where her short stories appeared from the early 1950s

One afternoon some unfriendly men dressed in civilian clothes and carrying revolvers came to our house searching for my father, or for information ab(...)

Dear Minister, Why can’t we get the prisons right? It’s not such a big job. A few years ago, we had less than 500 prisoners; even today it’s not much (...)

Key locations: the eight sites in Dublin 4 and Dublin 6 are marked on the maps

The Easter Rising began on Easter Monday – April 24th – 1916. The rebel leader Pádraig Pearse agreed to an unconditional surrender on Saturday, April (...)

Taking aim: An Irish Army soldier, wearing a German-style helmet, trains in 1939. Photograph: Keystone/Getty

Getting up the noses of the Germans seems to come easily to us. The Anglo Irish Bank man’s sardonic bar of Deutschland Über Alles and the football (...)