Richard Dormer

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Richard Dormer: arrived in New York as an 18-year-old and after a career in law enforcement  rose to the rank of Suffolk County Police Commissioner.

The New York Times once dispatched a reporter out to Suffolk County on Long Island to interview Richard Dormer. America’s newspaper of record was intr(...)

Game of Thrones is the world’s most popular television series and irrefutable proof that an epic tale of dragons, ice-zombies and people who like to s(...)

The Lyric Theatre in Belfast: ‘We were keen to imbue the new building with the spirit of the old,’ says Mark Carruthers

Belfast’s Lyric Theatre is 50 years old. What began as a personal crusade and grew into an important cultural movement is now one of Ireland’s leading(...)

Joe Duffy: Holding a mirror to Irish life

On the face of it, the news that Joe Duffy is to appear in a pantomime is in danger of causing reality to collapse in on itself under the weight of to(...)

Good Vibrations: the full-throated spirit of punk is alive and roaring in the Lyric Theatre auditorium

GOOD VIBRATIONS Lyric Theatre, Belfast ★★★★ When you hear the words “stage musical” you don’t tend to imagine a posse of young punks belting out a so(...)

How did Richard Dormer’s agent not talk him out of playing the lead?

Here’s an old joke: What happens if you play a country song backwards? You get your wife back, your truck back and your dog back. Hoary as this gag i(...)

From the Hollywoo hills: A scene from Bojack Horseman

The longest face in Hollywoo (whose iconic showbiz sign lost its ‘D’ way back in series one) still belongs to Bojack Horseman (Netflix, streaming from(...)

Rosie Redman and the Covey (Joseph Linnane) in a scene from an Abbey Theatre production of Sean O’Casey’s The Plough And The Stars in 1942. Photograph: Haywood Magee/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

They don’t make them like this any more. Sitting at the back of the Abbey’s rehearsal space is what I take to be one of the theatre’s most famed props(...)

Amy Conroy: ‘There is this fixed idea of what it means to be a man or a woman, and there is very little fluidity, and I don’t believe that is how we really are’

‘Ah, my boy hair,” Amy Conroy says as she catches sight of herself in one of many mirrors in a Dublin hotel bar. “I forgot about the boy hair.” (...)

Patrick Lonergan: ‘The collapse of the Celtic Tiger has been met with a blurring of distinctions in our theatre: between devised and scripted work, between adaptations and originals, between the personal and the global, between Ireland and the rest of the world - between the actor, the director, the author and the audience - and between male and female, gay and straight, rich and poor.’ Photograph: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland

In 2005, Irish theatre had one of its worst ever years. Symbolising a growing crisis in the production of new Irish writing, the Dublin Theatre Festiv(...)

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