In Ireland, children and the aged accounted for one-third of the Irish population in the 1840s, but three-fifths of the deaths.

How to name the Great Famine? For some people, especially Irish-Americans, even using that phrase is an anathema; they prefer the term The Great Hunge(...)

One of Ireland’s best loved children’s books comes to mind when reading this week’s choice for new fiction. Marita Conlon McKenna’s Under the Hawthorn(...)

From left, Liam Burke, PJ Brady, Angela Harding, Sheila Flitton and Michael Judd at the Irish Theatre Institute, Dublin. Photograph: Clodagh Kilcoyne

You can hear the actors before you see them: five spirited thespians reunited after one of their most important projects in years. Between them, they(...)

Marie, Louis and Layla Carroll at the opening of the Film Ireland festival in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong is the city that gifted us the violent visual poetry of John Woo and his black-suited face-offs, the balletic martial arts thrills of Bruce (...)

Michael O’Brien: ‘We decided to create a new literature for Irish children that didn’t exist. The area was dominated by the British, to the extent that they were reinventing Irish culture with very corny Oirish things, while Irish writers, in order to get published, were becoming Anglophile.’ Photograph: Fergal Phillips

It’s a publishing house that has pushed boundaries and set new standards in the Irish book world for 40 years, but O’Brien Press was founded in sur(...)