Liam Morrison

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Mystery blue balls wash up on Dollymount Strand, Dublin. Photograph: Brian Bolger

Marine scientists are to begin investigating mysterious blue balls that have been washing up on Dublin beaches as efforts continue to find out where t(...)

Researchers noted that European production of non-woven textiles for hygiene and sanitary products – those that frequently cause blockages in sewage systems – exceeded 1m tonnes in 2016. File photograph: iStock

Half of wet-wipe brands labelled “flushable” are found to contain harmful plastic microfibres that end up in Irish waters, a new study has found. The(...)

Researchers noted that European production of non-woven textiles for hygiene and sanitary products – those that frequently cause blockages in sewage systems – exceeded 1m tonnes in 2016.

Half of wet-wipe brands labelled “flushable” are found to contain harmful plastic microfibres that end up in Irish waters, a new study has found. Th(...)

Ireland is the third-highest seaweed producer in Europe. In 2016 it landed 29,500 tonnes, about 11 per cent of the total market.s

The future of a 300-year-old industry that has helped shape the identity of coastal communities and played a role in assisting those afflicted by the (...)

Dr Conor Graham of the Marine and Freshwater Research Centre at the Galway Mayo Institute of Technology, and Dr Liam Morrison, at the Ryan Institute, NUI Galway, explaining their research. Photograph: Chris Maddaloni

Two new studies by Irish environmental scientists have established a shellfish “fingerprint”, tracing the food from sea to plate with pinpoint accurac(...)

New Celtic signing  Jonathan Afolabi in the stands at Celtic Park during the Betfred Cup second-round match against Dunfermline. Photograph: Jeff Holmes/PA Wire

Celtic have signed Republic of Ireland under-19 international Jonathan Afolabi and the 19-year-old was at Celtic Park to watch his new team beat Dunfe(...)

A ‘green tide’ of algae at the Tolka estuary, north Dublin

Sprawling beds of bright green seaweed caused by human waste products around the Irish coastline are thought to be on the rise, new research has indic(...)

Dr Liam Morrison of NUI Galway, who has led a new study on the impact on human health of arsenic in seaweed used for animal feed, collecting samples of Ascophyllum Nodosum seaweed on the shoreline.

Arsenic found in a type of seaweed harvested on the Irish coastline for use as animal feed has a “negligible impact” on human health, a study led by a(...)

 Sandhoppers, or tonachán trá: ‘Usually there are a huge crowd of them together, helping each other loyally and stoutly’. Drawing by Michael Viney

Between the mowings of summer winds and wrenching storms of winter, a huge mass of seaweed, rich in sugars and minerals, is cast ashore. Nature doesn’(...)

Arsenic can occur naturally in certain rock types and thereby affect groundwater. File photograph: Getty Images/iStockphoto

“Elevated” levels of naturally-occurring arsenic have been detected in a small number of groundwater sources for drinking water, according to a new na(...)

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