David Wilmot

10 results

Barry Keoghan and Cosmo Jarvis in Calm with Horses

Nick Rowland has created an impressively spooky version of County Nowhere in this tense, well-acted variation on a Colin Barrett story about mad hoodl(...)

Ben Whishaw in Little Joe

Nobody allergic to big ideas should approach the films of Jessica Hausner without a facemask and a biohazard suit. In work such as Lourdes and Amour F(...)

Jessica Hausner: Her new film Little Joe has picked up multiple prizes at the Austrian Film Awards

Jessica Hausner is attempting to make a sound that, as she puts it, falls somewhere between juicy and cracking. It’s the chilling sound of the titular(...)

Brian Gleeson in RTÉ’s new  drama Resistance

History may be written by the victors, but from Tolstoy to O’Casey more interesting stories tend to belong to its bystanders. In Rebellion, RTÉ’s his(...)

Four men in a boat: Danny Sheehy, Brendan Begley, Glen Hansard and Liam Holden. “Danny told me, ‘If you can play a gig for three hours then you can row for six’”

Glen Hansard has been away. Has he been for a week on the beach or a few days at a spa? He has not. The craggy, bearded singer has just returned from (...)

The film that has ended up being Andy Serkis’s debut feature (after his version of The Jungle Book got kicked back a year) opens in an idyllic version(...)

Girl united: Maisie Williams and David Wilmot in Gold

Niall Heery belatedly follows up Small Engine Repair, his 2006 mumblecore critical hit, with a slightly less off-centre comedy that makes imaginati(...)

Maisie Williams: ‘I realised leaving school that I was leaving behind a lot of people who wanted to see me fall.’ Photograph:   Simon Lees/Getty Images

Bright, articulate and opinionated, Maisie Williams is, in the nicest possible sense, a right old chatterbox. We say old. The Bristol-born actress was(...)

Apparently, cinema is broken this week. And so we’re stuck with the weakest batch of new releases since, well, around this time four years ago. All ar(...)

John Michael McDonagh’s problematic follow-up to The Guard begins with an ingenious, arrest(...)