Original painting by Sophie McKay Knight, with imagery contributed by women scientists from the University of St Andrews – part of the Chrysalis project coordinated by Mhairi Stewart.

“Why are women bad at maths?” You might remember that corny joke that did the rounds donkeys of years ago. You might even remember its punchline. It t(...)

 Inside Howth Martello tower – home of Ye Olde Hurdy-Gurdy Museum of Vintage Radio

If you want to try a slightly different tourist attraction on your holidays, why not explore one of the following museums dedicated to the history of (...)

‘I caught myself complaining out loud to an otherwise empty kitchen about those little stickers “they” put on bananas and which you have to peel off when recycling them.’ Photograph: iStockphoto

Gerry was a retired civil servant who had been a dedicated Irish Times reader for decades. For a time we worked in an office which Gerry had moved ont(...)

 Ada Lovelace: computer genius and daughter of Lord Byron

Those unfortunate people who think coincidence is a sound reason for betting on horses – and I’m one, occasionally – may be interested in tonight’s 6.(...)

Girls don’t see the people who are in technology careers like the people in the ‘Big Bang Theory’, says Cathal Grogan, managing director, Verify Recruitment.

Why don’t more girls go into technology careers? The organisers behind a new Irish schools programme called the Ada Lovelace Initiative (ALI) believe (...)

William Parsons  discerned the spiral structure of the M51 nebula, which the Hubble space telescope has photographed the nebula in detail (above). Photograph: ESA/Hubble

In March and April 1845 William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, together with his collaborators, made the greatest scientific discovery in the history (...)

Halpin hand: Katy Perry at Super Bowl XLIX. Photograph: Christopher Polk/Getty

February 1st was a good day for quite a few people who happened to find themselves in Arizona. It was a good day for fans of the New England Patriots,(...)

Walter Isaacson: An essay by his daughter inspired him to write about women who were responsible for many tech innovations. photograph: vanessa vick/the new york times

While spending the summer of 2007 in Aspen, Colorado, Walter Isaacson and his wife, Cathy, spent much of their waking moments hounding their daughter (...)