Aaron Dunne from DCU pictured show an VR machine to Antonelle Ferrecchia EU Programme manager for Insight.

Science education has come a long way. Before the primary school’s last major revision, almost 20 years ago, science education was patchy at best whil(...)

Getting ready for departure on the Science Bus  were four of the five science bus drivers (captains) from Ireland; Stephen Davitt, Claire O’Connell, Aoibhéann Bird and Phil Smyth,   with DCU president Prof Brian MacCraith in the centre at back. Photograph: Daire Hall

What happens when you load up a campervan with gear for science and engineering workshops, hit the road and travel around Europe, encouraging people t(...)

Less than a quarter of science, technology, engineering and maths workers are female.

Points for many engineering and technology courses have fallen, despite a number of Government initiatives to attract young people into the industry. (...)

Ireland’s only Aquanaut Dr Marc Ó Gríofa with Jake (15); and Robyn (12) Guildea at the Diving into Space event as part of Science Week at the National Aquatic Centre. Photograph: Naoise Culhane

Outer space was brought down to Earth on Sunday as Dubliners donned scuba gear to “dive into space”, kicking off this year’s Science Week in Dublin. (...)

SR Stem May 2016. The Glory satellite mission is designed to make measurements of both the sun and the Earth. Credit: NASA

Who’d want a career in science or engineering? Quite a few, it would seem. A decade or so ago, the low CAO points for science courses suggested tha(...)

Tara McCarthy of St Angela’s College, Cork; Maedbh Heaney, Scoil Mhuire, Cork; Gillian Keating of Cork Chamber; and Saoirse Terry of Coachford College, Cork, at the launch of the I Wish events in Cork on February 12th, promoting Stem careers to girls and women. Photograph: Darragh Kane

Science, technology, engineering and maths (collectively known as Stem) has a women problem. These areas have always attracted and retained more bo(...)