Neil Woodford: his reputation lies in ruins.

For years, Neil Woodford was regarded as Britain’s answer to Warren Buffett, an iconic fund manager who could be relied upon to beat the market. Now, (...)

What’s going to happen? Technical analysts try to predict future price trends by studying past price action and charts

Some investors aren’t interested in spending hours studying a company’s fundamentals. They look for answers by studying price action and charts. Is th(...)

Warren Buffett (speaking for the Hillary Clinton campaign): like other legendary fund managers, he has had his bad years along with the good. Photograph: Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

Many investors are sceptical of the oft-repeated advice that it is extremely difficult to beat the stock market, arguing that legendary money managers(...)

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange: Research indicates that returns are usually dictated more by chance than skill. Photograph: Justin Lane/EPA

Does luck trump skill in investment. Research indicates that returns are usually dictated more by chance than skill, and it’s hard to tell the differe(...)

Economist, author and Yale University professor Robert Shiller

Eugene Fama’s academic career is built on the efficient market hypothesis (EMH), dismissed by Robert Shiller as “one of the most remarkable errors in(...)

Neil Woodford:  to leave Invesco next April  to start his own business after a 25-year career that has given him an almost cult following among British investors.

Neil Woodford, one of the investment industry’s most closely watched fund managers, will leave Invesco Perpetual to start his own business after a 25-(...)