Britain’s prime minister Theresa May said “either this was a direct act by the Russian state against our country” or Vladimir Putin’s government had “lost control of this potentially catastrophically damaging nerve agent”. Photograph: AFP/PRU

Theresa May has told MPs it is highly likely that Russia was behind the attempted murder with a nerve agent last week which left a former spy and his (...)

British home secretary Theresa May: she  announced a freeze on the UK assets of Andrei Kovtun and Dmitry Lugovoy, who is now a Russian member of parliament, after a judge said there was “no doubt” they poisoned Alexander Litvinenko in London in 2006. Photograph: PA Wire

David Cameron has promised tougher action against Russia after a public inquiry found that President Vladimir Putin probably ordered the murder of fo(...)

 Alexander Litvinenko in  2006: Forensic tests  uncovered a trail of  polonium-210 –  which is used in Russia’s nuclear industry –  following the movements of Andrei Lugovoy and Dmitry Kovtun, allowing Robert Owen  to declare in his report that he was “sure” the two men administered the poison that killed Litvinenko. Photograph: PA

As Alexander Litvinenko lay dying in a London hospital in November 2006, neither he nor his doctors understood the nature of his illness. But the form(...)

Anatoly Litvinenko,  son of  Alexander Litvinenko, and  his mother Mariana  outside the High Court in central London. Photograph: Reuters/Peter Nicholls

Russian president Vladimir Putin is a “tin pot despot” who personally ordered the 2006 poisoning murder of ex-KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko in London(...)

 Dmitry Kovtun: changed his mind in March about taking part and asked to appear before the inquiry. Photograph: Pavel Golovkin/AP

One of two Russians accused of murdering ex-KGB spy Alexander Litvinenko with a radioactive poison in London in 2006 was given a final chance today to(...)