In 2003, Chuck Feeney signed off on a decision to spend all of his fortune in his lifetime. “Giving while living,” he called it.

Chuck Feeney today is a man of no property. He and his wife Helga live in a modest rented apartment in San Francisco. He has no car or luxuries of any(...)

Heavy statistic: some 23 per cent of Irish adults are classified as obese. Photograph: Peter Dazeley/Getty

Imagine sneaking a cigarette into your child’s lunchbox as a “Friday treat”. Picture yourself celebrating a birthday party by laying on a nicotine fea(...)

Prof Anne Marie Healy: says  the inhaler will  be particularly effective for use by patients with cystic fibrosis

An Irish researcher based at Trinity College Dublin’s Amber science centre has been awarded €600,000 in funding as part of an €8.8 million internatio(...)

Mark McCloskey: much of his early career was with Denis O’Brien’s Esat Telecom at a time when it was a proving ground for a whole generation of future Irish business leaders.

It all started in hospital, appropriately enough. Recuperating in a four-bed ward after knee surgery, access to the television quickly became an irrit(...)

The decision by Atlantic Philanthropies to give the largest grant in its history to Trinity College Dublin (TCD) and the University of California San (...)

Atlantic Philanthropies founder Chuck Feeney (right) with president and chief executive Christopher Oechsli. Photograph: Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Atlantic Philanthropies is to give €138 million – its largest grant to date – to Trinity College Dublin and University of California San Francisco to (...)

DNA molecules seen under a microscope. Experts on DNA and data say without access to the cloud, modern genomics would grind to a halt

Amazon. com is in a race against Google to store data on human DNA, seeking both bragging rights in helping scientists make new medical discoveries an(...)

File photograph of people suffering from HIV/AIDS holding candles for   World AIDS Day. Photograph:Rupak De Chowdhuri /Reuters

When scientists made the stunning announcement last year that a baby born with HIV had apparently been cured through aggressive drug treatment (...)

New research emanating from the US has sparked fresh debate about whether certain forms of cancer should be classified as cancers at all.The issue has(...)

A radiographer prepares a woman for a breast screening. US researchers are suggesting that screening strategies need to be personalised and not all abnormal growths should be called cancers.

Low-risk growths in the breast, prostate and elsewhere should no longer be called cancer and screening efforts to spot them should be cut back, a wor(...)