Ripe apples ready for harvesting.   Photograph: iStock

If you’ve ever eaten a ripe plum straight from its parent tree or plucked it from the grassy ground beneath its branches, then you’ll know that it’s a(...)

Pots of young seedlings ready to be pricked out. Photograph: Richard Johnston

While coronavirus has brought many traumatic changes to our world, it has also served as a powerful reminder of how intimately our lives are bound to (...)

Jobs to do in the garden

 Tomatoes: If you can lavish these hungry, thirsty, heat-loving plants with plenty of attention throughout the growing season, then they’ll rewar(...)

Box hedging in an Irish garden. Photograph:  Richard Johnston

Like shiny-haired, doe-eyed contestants in a reality TV show, it’s the prettiest plants in fullest leaf and bonniest bloom – those exhibiting what the(...)

Photograph: Getty

If you’re an inveterate seed junkie like me, then you’ll almost certainly have spent the last few weeks relishing the annual post-Christmas horticultu(...)

The native Irish primrose (Primula vulgaris) flowering in an Irish woodland this spring.  Photograph:  Richard Johnston

I spotted the first flush of wild primroses flowering in nearby woods a few weeks ago. Speckled along the edges of a steep, damp bank that sits beneat(...)

Photograph: Moment/Getty

Few things feel more counter-intuitive to a gardener than the annual late winter/early spring ritual that is rose pruning. Because if you want your ro(...)

Amaryllis: Plant its giant fleshy bulbs into a pot in the next few weeks and you should have its tall, splendid, lily-like blooms in time for Christmas when the plants make an excellent gift. Photograph: Getty

It’s a funny old business, gardening. So much of it involves planning for the future that it sometimes feels as if we gardeners live our lives in two (...)

A vibrant combination of pink comsos, scarlet roses and purple lythrum growing in Helen Dillon’s old garden in Ranelagh a few years ago. Photograph:   Richard Johnston

Is there any other topic more subjective – or more divisive – to gardeners than colour in terms of how we perceive it, enjoy it and use it in our gard(...)