5 products to help you avoid bad eyebrow days

There’s a product out there to sort out every eyebrow-related worry

 

Brows are difficult to get right and seem to evoke a lot of opinions. Perhaps it isn’t surprising that we are judgmental about the features we feel most insecure about in ourselves, and there is no doubting that a lot of us feel insecure about our eyebrows.

Many women survived the 1990s (thankfully), but few eyebrows did. Brow trends may shift and eddy in the whorls of time, but brows decimated by a slash and burn grooming regime are rarely restored to former glory. Also, some of us are born with less eyebrow than we might like, or lose some or all brow hair due to illness. Products are an easy enhancement or coping mechanism for every sort of eyebrow-related worry.

Everyone is and should be free to wear whatever make-up they feel happiest in, so it feels unkind to say that brow make-up can go horribly wrong, but there you have it. A bad brow can elicit confusion like no other from an onlooker. If the broad, squat density of a very dark tadpole brow or the perma-shock of a twine-thin slash of product brings you joy, wear it with pride. However, if one of these styles adorns your face as a thoughtless throwback to trends past, let it go. Something more natural looking is almost always more flattering and easier to apply – at least for everyday make-up. When make-up is only about habit, it has ceased to serve a purpose and, in these cases, it really is better to wear none at all.

Anastasia Dipbrow Pomade.
Anastasia Dipbrow Pomade.

Thankfully for those who want to wear them, brow products just keep getting better. Anastasia Dipbrow Pomade (€22) or Brow Wiz Crayon (€25), both at arnotts.ie, will provide a fuller and more defined brow respectively.

Brow Wiz Crayon.
Brow Wiz Crayon.

The shade range recognises the nuance in hair colours, and none are too warm – warm brow shades instantly always looks jarring (even on redheads and warm blondes). The brush you use with Dipbrow Pomade will determine the finish, but it can create thin, defined strokes or a robust brow with equal ease.

Glossier Boy Brow.
Glossier Boy Brow.

To increase fluffiness, and thereby natural looking fullness, try a brow mascara like Glossier Boy Brow (€15 at glossier.com), just make sure to clean excess from the tip of the wand to prevent uneven distribution.

Lime Crush Bushy Brow Precision Pen
Lime Crush Bushy Brow Precision Pen

For skilled brow appliers, Lime Crime Bushy Brow Precision Pen (€25.58 at asos.com) allows you to draw in individual hairs to fill gaps or boost brow size in a way that looks very natural.

L’Oréal Paris Unbelievabrow.
L’Oréal Paris Unbelievabrow.

I also love the new L’Oréal Paris Unbelievabrow (€19.95 at Boots) for this. Rather than applying the wand applicator directly to the brow, which will leave a very heavy finish, dab some on the back of your hand and use the brush that comes with it to apply in light strokes.

If this seems like too much work, Hourglass Arch Brow Sculpting Pencil (€42 at Space NK) can give a soft wash of colour through the brows in a few sweeps. Blend it with the spoolie on the other end of the product, and you have immediate fuss-free brows.

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