Woods win adds to Ryder Cup narrative, the second coming for Sheedy and Tipp

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Team Europe and captain Thomas Bjorn with the Ryder Cup trophy. Photograph: Carl Recine/Reuters

Team Europe and captain Thomas Bjorn with the Ryder Cup trophy. Photograph: Carl Recine/Reuters

The 2018 Ryder Cup gets underway on Friday, and Tiger Woods’s stunning victory in the Tour Championship has added another narrative to one of sport’s greatest spectacles. And, as Philip Reid writes, the 14-time Major winner’s renaissance on the course can now complement his evolution off it: “Where once viewed as akin to a square peg being put into a round hole in past team environments, Woods’s evolution and maturing into a team player has been intriguing.” Meanwhile Team Europe captain Thomas Bjorn has insisted Sergio Garcia is in a “good place,” despite the Spanish wildcard pick enduring one of the more torrid seasons of his career. “He’s no more than any of the other 11, but he’s also very much a big part of what we do. I’m delighted with the conversations I’ve had with him.” And in the latest instalment of his ‘From the back pages’ column, this morning Ruaidhrí Croke looks back at the 1949 Ryder Cup. The Americans brought “600 steaks, six hams, 12 sides of beef and four boxes of bacon,” in a bid to sustain themselves in post-war Britain, as Portrush’s Fred Daly became the first Irish golfer to play in the tournament on home soil.

It is the second coming for Liam Sheedy and Tipperary, after the 48-year-old was ratified as the county’s senior hurling manager last night. Sheedy guided Tipp to the All-Ireland Championship in 2010 - stopping Kilkenny’s push for five-in-a-row in the process - before leaving the role. He replaces Michael Ryan, who stepped down after a disappointing 2018 campaign in which his side failed to win any of their four fixtures in the round-robin stages of the Munster Championship. And as Ian O’Riordan writes, Sheedy’s second tenure is far from guaranteed to be a success: “The last hurling manager to realise such a successful return was Cyril Farrell, who managed Galway to the 1980 All-Ireland, took a breather, then came back and won two more in 1987 and 1988.”

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