Liverpool place some non-playing staff on furlough

Club confirm staff will receive 100 per cent of salaries with help from government scheme

Liverpool have placed some non-playing staff on forlough, meaning the government will pay 80% of their wages. Photograph: Julian Finney/Getty

Liverpool have placed some non-playing staff on forlough, meaning the government will pay 80% of their wages. Photograph: Julian Finney/Getty

 

Liverpool have placed some non-playing staff on furlough as the Premier League remains suspended due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Around 200 staff, whose work is effectively idle during the Premier League suspension, have been furloughed as the league leaders join Newcastle, Tottenham, Bournemouth and Norwich in turning to the government’s job retention scheme.

Liverpool, who in February announced pre-tax profits of £42million for 2018-19, will top up the public money received from the government to ensure the affected staff receive their full salaries.

The announcement comes as Premier League clubs are meeting with representatives of players and managers to discuss possible wage cuts for first-team staff.

A Liverpool club statement said: “The club have confirmed those staff will be paid 100 per cent of their salaries to ensure no member of staff is financially disadvantaged.

“Last month the club also confirmed that it would pay its matchday and non-matchday staff while the Premier League is suspended.”

In February, Liverpool published their accounts for 2018-19, showing turnover for the year was up £78million to £533million, though profits fell in relation to the previous year after a record £223million investment on players.

Talks between the Premier League, Professional Footballers’ Association (PFA) and League Managers’ Association (LMA) on potential wage cuts are taking place on Saturday.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.