Scotland Schick after wonder strike; Gerry Thornley on Ireland’s summer Tests

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Scotland’s goalkeeper David Marshall in the net after he was lobbed by Czech Republic’s Patrik Schick during their Euro 2020 clash at Hampden Park. Photo: Andy Buchanan/AP Photo

Scotland’s goalkeeper David Marshall in the net after he was lobbed by Czech Republic’s Patrik Schick during their Euro 2020 clash at Hampden Park. Photo: Andy Buchanan/AP Photo

After waiting 23 years to return to a major tournament, Scotland were left disappointed yesterday when they were beaten 2-0 by Czech Republic with Patrik Schick grabbing the limelight thanks to a stunning 50-yard strike. It had all seemed so rosy beforehand as Mary Hannigan writes this morning that “it had promised to be a very lovely afternoon in Hampden Park, too, the natives well up for it, not least when Flower of Scotland filled the air, a tune still so perfect it would make you wish you’d been at the Battle of Bannockburn in your kilt to help out.” The result leaves the Scots on the back foot in their group but, afterwards, manager Steve Clark was not blaming goalkeeper David Marshall for being lobbed. In the final game of the day last night Spain were left frustrated by a host of missed chances as Sweden managed to squeeze out a draw while, earlier, Slovakia surprised Poland with a 2-1 win. For reports, analysis and more you can keep fully up-to-date with all that’s going on at the tournament on our Euro 2020 website.

Moving on to rugby and Andy Farrell says he wants Ireland to play their summer Tests with a “fearless” style after he named his squad yesterday. “Being able to play what’s in front of you and being able to play quick is going to be absolutely vital and it’s something that we’ve already started and something that we want to see a big improvement in,” the head coach said yesterday. In his column this morning Gerry Thornley writes that the upcoming Tests could prove to be the perfect testing ground for fresh blood with half an eye on the World Cup in 2023. “Ireland’s depth chart is being tested more severely, and looks better equipped to cope, in some areas more than others,” he writes.

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