Remembering Jack Charlton; Ken Early on Mourinho going through the motions

The Morning Sports Briefing: Keep ahead of the game with ‘The Irish Times’ sports team

Former Republic of Ireland manager Jack Charlton, who died on Friday, used to regularly go on fishing trips to Mayo. Photo: Ray McManus/Sportsfile

Former Republic of Ireland manager Jack Charlton, who died on Friday, used to regularly go on fishing trips to Mayo. Photo: Ray McManus/Sportsfile

It was a big one, alright. When it comes to the death of a sportsperson there aren’t many out there who have had such a profound impact on the Irish nation as Jack Charlton. This morning we have plenty of coverage of his passing with a special commemorative supplement in today’s newspaper. There aren’t many better ways to haver lived your life than by making millions of people happy but that’s what Charlton did in those six rollercoaster years from Euro 88 to USA 94. This morning Malachy Clerkin writes that the outpouring of emotion over the weekend was as much mourning for Charlton as mourning for those great times. Over the course of those six years, Peter Byrne was there all the way reporting on Ireland taking our place at the top table of the biggest sport in the world and this morning he remembers Charlton, who he knew well and collaborated with on his World Cup diaries, as a sensitive and warm soul with a gruff exterior.

It’s been clear to see over the weekend just how much Charlton meant to his players and how much of an impact he had on them. Mark Lawrenson was part of the first few years of Charlton’s reign and scored the crucial goal in the qualifying win over Scotland in 1987. This morning he writes that searing honesty and a sense of always being in control is what defined Charlton during his time in charge. Over the course of the last two days the tributes have poured in from all corners on television and radio with Mary Hannigan describing it in her column this morning as a proper Irish wake for the man who gave the nation notions.

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