Rory McIlroy returns to winning ways; future Newcastle success will feel hollow

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Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland celebrates with the trophy after victory at the CJ Cup in Las Vegas. Photograph:  Christian Petersen/Getty Images

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland celebrates with the trophy after victory at the CJ Cup in Las Vegas. Photograph: Christian Petersen/Getty Images

Victory for Rory McIlroy at the CJ Cup in Las Vegas ensures that the Northern Irish golfer can put his recent Ryder Cup disappointment firmly in the rear view mirror. Starting the last day two shots behind overnight leader Rickie Fowler, a final round score of 66 - the highlight of which was an eagle putt from off the green at 14 - was good enough for a one-shot victory over Collin Morikawa. Speaking after becoming the 39th player to notch 20 PGA Tour wins, McIlroy admitted that he contemplated not playing again after the Ryder Cup defeat, but that he ultimately realised the importance of coming back: “I need to play golf, I need to simplify it. I need to just be me. I realised that being me is enough, and being me I can do things like this.”

Newcastle’s Sunday evening clash with Tottenham Hotspur was a worrying affair as the game had to be suspended in the first half when a fan in the stands required urgent medical treatment. Fortunately, the person in question was stabilised before being taken to hospital. It was just one of a number unique moments on the day that Newcastle’s new Saudi chairman Yasir al-Rumayyan was unveiled to St. James’ Park. In his column this morning, Ken Early questions how rewarding Newcastle fans will find any future success after the club’s takeover, arguing that “it won’t feel like they always dreamt it would feel, because everyone will understand the success has been bought by Saudi Arabia for the greater glory of Saudi Arabia.”

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