Jerry Kiernan’s death felt beyond athletics; tennis stars show their full sense of entitlement

The Morning Sports Briefing: Keep ahead of the game with ‘The Irish Times’ sports team

Burnley’s Ashley Barnes scores from the penalty spot in their 1-0 Premier League win over Liverpool. Photo: Peter Powell/AFP via Getty Images

Burnley’s Ashley Barnes scores from the penalty spot in their 1-0 Premier League win over Liverpool. Photo: Peter Powell/AFP via Getty Images

The sad news of Jerry Kiernan’s death which emerged yesterday was felt far beyond the world of athletics. The 67-year-old had been unwell in recent months. A native of Listowel in Kerry, he lived most of his adult life in Dublin, where he died on Wednesday night. After representing Ireland at the Olympics in 1984, twice winning the Dublin Marathon and, in more recent years, becoming a recognisable face on RTÉ, Kiernan was known far and wide and, as Ian O’Riordan writes, Kiernan could be unabashed in considering himself an aficionado in some of the finer things in life – national hunt racing, Barcelona football club, the Super Tuscan red wines – although running was always chief among them.

Moving on to soccer and Liverpool’s 68-game unbeaten record at Anfield was brought crashing down last night as Ashley Barnes struck late on from the penalty spot for Burnley to leave Jurgen Klopp’s side reeling. Liverpool now sit six points behind league-leaders Manchester United and have not scored a goal in 2021. After the match, Klopp questioned the penalty which Burnley had been awarded but took the blame for the defeat on himself, saying “It’s my responsibility, that’s the easy explanation. We lost the game which is pretty impossible but we did it. That is my fault.” Meanwhile, FAI chief executive Jonathan Hill says he believes Uefa still intend to host rescheduled Euro 2020 in 12 cities across the continent but that a decision will be made by March 5th as having fans in the stadium is “what creates the excitement and that unique feeling around any tournament.”

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