It’s taken a global pandemic to show that the GAA is local to its very core

There has never been a bigger appetite for club games among a national audience

Oulart-The Ballagh’s Garrett Sinnott scores a goal past goalkeeper Jack Cushe of Naomh Eanna during the Wexford SHC semi-final at Chadwicks Wexford Park. Photograph: Laszlo Geczo/Inpho

Oulart-The Ballagh’s Garrett Sinnott scores a goal past goalkeeper Jack Cushe of Naomh Eanna during the Wexford SHC semi-final at Chadwicks Wexford Park. Photograph: Laszlo Geczo/Inpho

In the early days of Ireland’s lockdown, when being told to stay home felt like a novelty and was accompanied by an unexpected burst of Mediterranean weather, the Cork writer and satirist Colm Tobin noted on Twitter: “I have to say, I didn’t expect the apocalypse to involve quite so much DIY.”

The pandemic has forced all sorts of questions about how everyone works and lives. The GAA, perhaps the last pillar still standing, has arguably undergone the biggest change of all.

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