Euro 2016: Croatia and Turkey charged over crowd trouble

Uefa opens disciplinary proceedings following crowd on disturbances on Friday

Croatian players gesture towards their own fans as flares land on the pitch. Photo: Robert Pratta/Reuters

Croatian players gesture towards their own fans as flares land on the pitch. Photo: Robert Pratta/Reuters

 

Europe’s soccer governing body Uefa has opened disciplinary proceedings against the soccer federations of Croatia and Turkey for crowd trouble during the Euro 2016 tournament in France.

Both federations could face sanctions for fans from their countries “throwing objects and setting off fireworks”, a statement read.

Croatia faces additional charges over alleged “racist behaviour”, while Turkey faces charges over supporters invading the pitch.

The incidents occurred on Friday during the Spain’s win over Turkey and the 2-2 draw between the Czech Republic and Croatia. The hearing will take place on Monday.

The Croatia game in St Etienne was held up for several minutes after its fans threw flares on to the pitch and began fighting among themselves.

Eight flares and other objects landed on the pitch near to riot police, who had been deployed in front of the section housing Croatia fans.

The trouble broke out in the dying minutes of a game that Croatia were leading 2-1. The final score was 2-2.

Croatia, sanctioned three times during the qualifying competition, are already facing a disciplinary hearing on Tuesday after fans threw flares and ran on to the pitch during the team’s opening match at the finals against Turkey in Paris.

Euro 2016 has been marred by violence, especially in Marseille last weekend when Russian fans clashed with English supporters before, during and after the Russia vs England game.

Earlier this week, French riot police sprayed tear gas and charged England fans in Lille before the England v Wales match.

France has enlisted more than 90,000 police, soldiers and private security agents nationwide to ensure safety in the face of intelligence agency warnings of potential militant Islamist attacks and the threat of hooliganism.

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